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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    1

    Default Garage woodshop conversion - Is the water heater a fire risk?

    I'm converting a two-car garage into a woodshop for myself, including flooring, new electrical, etc. One immovable object is the household gas-powered water heater which is set in a corner of the garage on a raised platform. I plan to use some kind of dust collection for the woodshop, but it occurred to me that sawdust and the water heater pilot and/or burner might be a problem. Any thoughts or suggestions to mitigate any risk?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,827

    Default Re: Garage woodshop conversion - Is the water heater a fire risk?

    Close it in and feed freash air for combustion from the outside.

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,160

    Default Re: Garage woodshop conversion - Is the water heater a fire risk?

    While combustion of dust or finish fumes is possible, it is unlikely. Enclose the water heater and either install an outside air source, or, install air grills in the door of it's enclosure. When I had my shop in my garage, I also had the HVAC along side the water heater. I enclosed both in a closet and put bypass closet doors on them, including the air grills. Dust getting into the equipment was minimal.

    Additionally, do yourself a favor and set up both a dust collection system, including a central collector with ports at each tool, a down draft sanding table, and an overhead air filter. The use of these things will further mitigate dust levels in the space, which will help keep the dirt out of the house as well.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,694

    Default Re: Garage woodshop conversion - Is the water heater a fire risk?

    Ventilation is important for a gas powered water heater, however, too much wind will cause disruptions in service.

    Around here, a lot of homes have their gas water heaters outside the house (in metal sheds). That frees some valuable space. If your house is in cold climate, this would not be a choice.

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