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  1. #1
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    Oct 2013
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    Default wallpaper everywhere

    I want to paint my walls but there are at least 3 layers of paper on the walls. We think there is plaster underneath it. Do we drywall over it or attempt to take it down?

  2. #2
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    Jul 2010
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    SoCal
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    Default Re: wallpaper everywhere

    You have to make some tough decisions. It will be so much work to remove 3 layers of wallpaper, plus endless skimming and finishing...that I would say: replace the drywall or add 1/4" drywall.

  3. #3
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    Oct 2013
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    Default Re: wallpaper everywhere

    It's an old house so the wallpaper is coming off pretty easily. I have noticed some cracks in the plaster but other than that nothing else from what I can see. As far as we know the drywall is covered with plaster or the whole wall is made of plaster. Can you paint over this or not?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: wallpaper everywhere

    If you rather paint it, yes you can paint - but first you have to prepare: repair, sand, skim coat and prime twice. It's a lot of work.

    The troubles will be glue residue and uneven finish. If you can tackle them, you will have a nice ceiling.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    7,191

    Default Re: wallpaper everywhere

    Quote Originally Posted by helpmediy View Post
    I want to paint my walls but there are at least 3 layers of paper on the walls. We think there is plaster underneath it. Do we drywall over it or attempt to take it down?
    Quote Originally Posted by helpmediy View Post
    It's an old house so the wallpaper is coming off pretty easily. I have noticed some cracks in the plaster but other than that nothing else from what I can see. As far as we know the drywall is covered with plaster or the whole wall is made of plaster. Can you paint over this or not?
    I'd recommend stripping the paper, if it's coming off relatively easy, this will be the best way to go. Get yourself some wallpaper remover OR make your own with hot tap water and fabric softener, apply with a household spray bottle or garden sprayer, you want to get the back of the paper and glue moistened. Depending on the surface of the paper, you may need a scoring tool, but I'd use this as a last resort, as they damage the wall surface more than they're worth most of the time. Use care with the water/wallpaper remover and your floors, you don't want to damage anything.

    Once the paper is removed, the good news is that the glue should scrub off with a damp sponge, as it is water based. You want to remove as much of the glue as possible, as it will show through if painted over. Once the wallpaper is removed you can assess and repair any cracks or damage to the wall surface, talk to us at this point and we'll walk you through the steps. After this, apply two coats of a good quality primer, such as Zinsser Bull's Eye 123 (blue label ) and two coats of your preferred paint.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: wallpaper everywhere

    If you do decide to remove the wallpapers, and if you don't have experience with drywall - be prepared for one messy and long job (if you want it to be perfect, that is). Drywall is an art, more than other trades, and not everyone can do it perfectly.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Dorset UK
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    13

    Default Re: wallpaper everywhere

    Really its a long process to remove three layers of wallpapers but if you want to do this then I think you have to hire wallpaper remover for it as it will release you from he process.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
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    Default Re: wallpaper everywhere

    If you are lucky, the original layer of wallpaper was hung with out fashioned wheatpaste. It was literally made from flour and wets very quickly with plain water. It also cleans off the wall rapidly and cleanly.

    If the old plaster is still tight to the wall, it is definitely worth the effort to patch minor cracks is well worth the effort. If you get into loose plaster, you might want to get the advice of a good plasterer ( a dying breed in most areas of the country).

    In the early part of the last century, even brand new plaste would be hung with a canvas. This protected against minor hairline cracks and also allow that years of oil paint build up could be simply ripped off the wall back down to the original plaster.

    There are still decorative canvases available which can be hung directly on plaster and give years of tough, washable service. Many are available with textures, such as faux stucco, or lightly textured and colors. they are mostly used in commercial applications such as offices and restaurants, but lend themselves well to homes.

    The Chicago Art Institue has the entire galleries covered in a rouge weave canvas which has been painted a clean white. It makes a really great, subdued background which does not distract from the Old Masters hanging there.

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