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Thread: mold

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    2

    Cool mold

    I have a 1928 built farmhouse. The previous owners knocked down the two chimneys to below the roof line, patched the roof and put up new roof shingles. I remodeled the third floor and knocked down the chimneys to below the third floor, floor level. I am now experiencing mold problems on the two rooms the chimney straddles on the second floor. Could it be possible that moisture is wicking up from ground level, through the chimney, feeding the mold? If so, is there a way to fix this…other than taking both chimneys down to the ground level. Side note…I am in a low lying area so when it rains a lot, there is standing water.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,323

    Default Re: mold

    Maybe you did a less than perfect job, and now you have moisture causing mold.

    First fix the leak, then eradicate the mold and finish again. You will find out soon if you were successful or not.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: mold

    Quote Originally Posted by dj1 View Post
    Maybe you did a less than perfect job, and now you have moisture causing mold.

    First fix the leak, then eradicate the mold and finish again. You will find out soon if you were successful or not.
    I don't have a leak.....is it possble for the chimneys to wick the moisture from the ground level. Professionals dropped the chimney below the roof line and put a new roof on. I dropped the chimney in the third floor to below the floor level between the third and second level.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,700

    Default Re: mold

    If the bricks are touching the ground, I suppose that could, but they would be evaporating the moisture as it rises so you would expect the bricks to be much dryer on the second floor than on the first floor. I would look around for other sources. You could also get a moisture meter to check the bricks with, they are pretty cheap.

    More likely, the bricks conduct cold from the ground and cold causes condensation. This would be more true if one side of the chimney is exposed to the exterior.

    You can treat the wood or anything that is supporting mold with a sodium borate solution. Timbor is good for this. Google for this and you can find sources, uses, instructions and recipes for making your own pretty cheap.

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