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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default ulating a basement furnace room

    I'm about ready to insulate my basement. However, I do not know what to do in my furnace room (natural gas furnace and water heater). Presently there are poured concrete walls and no ceiling. A bedroom is directly above it and it is the coldest room in the house (plus it is the north west corner of the house). I will be using rigid foam insulation in the rest of the basement. Can I use the same in the furnace room? Are there different regulations? What are the do's and dont's when insulating a furnace room? Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,073

    Default Re: ulating a basement furnace room

    See today's answers to another post: "My family room is cold".

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    820

    Default Re: ulating a basement furnace room

    around here, by fire code, you have to put 5/8" sheetrock above the furnace

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: ulating a basement furnace room

    Why is your bedroom so cold???? You should call your heating service person to come over & check the hot air supply/return ducts leading to this room to determine why you're not getting enough heat in this room.

    When insulating the boiler room/furnace room, you must take special care to avoid covering any vents/openings that would restrict combustion air from being used by the furnace & hot water heater; for every cubic ft. of gas that these appliances burn, they need SEVERAL TIMES MORE cu.ft. of AIR in order for combustion to take place, without causing the creation of carbon monoxide/carbon dioxide/ soot in the combustion process---you can have your heating service person also check this out when the ducts are checked out.

    Sometimes homeowners install wads of pink insulation between floor joists to section off different parts of the cellar---pink insulation wads should be removed to allow the free movement of air throughout the full cellar.

    If the boiler room is large, such as 30' X 20' or larger & is part of the rest of the basement, there is usually no problem with sufficient combustion air; but if the furnace is in a CONFINED SPACE, such as 10' X 10' or smaller, this is known as a CONFINED SPACE boiler room & usually 2 12" X 12" screened louvers have to be installed in the exterior walls to communicate with the outside air; however, there are a number of alternatives for areas that have cold winters, such as one supply & one return vent to the attic, which is usually louvered & open to the outdoors. NFPA 54.
    Last edited by Dobbs; 10-16-2013 at 10:01 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,580

    Default Re: ulating a basement furnace room

    In the Chicago area, it is the norm to have the furnace and water heater in the basement. Usually, no provision is made for outside air, as the average american house leaks so much air. Where it is located in the living area in a small room or closet, a louvered door is simply used to allow in combustion air from the house envelope.

    I would agree with Dobbs, if your bedroom is cold, it is more due to poor duct layout. Get a qualified heating firm to evaluate what can be done. I recently went through this because my great room was hot in summer and cool in winter. It is 15X30 with cathedral ceilings but only had two vents at opposite ends of the room. A dedicated 6 inch line direct to the furness placed in the middle of that 30 foot wall fixed the problem.

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