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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    58

    Default Fixing Wall Corner Water Damage



    Hopefully the piccie shows what's going on. Apparently there was some sort of 'flood' in my house during the previous owner's tenure. I didn't realise it until I yanked the carpeting last year. And finally, a while back, the corners around this closet just dissolved.

    I have a triple challenge: I am a total sheet rock 'noob'... and I'm partially disabled (I get tired)... and I'm on a fixed income. So I'm looking for a (hopefully) relatively easy/cheap DIY fix if possible. If it's something that requires a pro, just let me know.

    I -guess- one cuts out the old sheet rock on both sides of the corner and then replaces. Correct? But how much does one cut out? Do you have to cut out large enough pieces on both sides to be able to nail onto studs on each side or can one just patch and tape somehow?

    If this is too much for a question like this but maybe there are pre-made videos or books that demonstrate this is child-simple directions?

    (And after this, I guess I'll have to tackle the floor stains!)

    TIA,

    --JC
    Last edited by suntower; 09-20-2013 at 05:57 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    SoCal
    Posts
    5,066

    Default Re: Fixing Wall Corner Water Damage

    From the picture, you cut the drywall from side to side and as high as you need. Clean the studs, remove all nails/screws and corner beads. Remove the baseboard and put aside, if you are going to re-use it. Clean the framing and let dry.

    Cut a new piece of drywall to size and screw it on. All screws must go into studs. Install a new corner bead (metal or plastic). Tape , mud, sand, prime and paint.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,480

    Default Re: Fixing Wall Corner Water Damage

    What DJ said.

    I would add to stick with metal corner trim, because it will match up better with the existing metal trim.

    Check out wall patch/repair videos on youtube to get an idea of the technique and tools to use. Don't be afraid to ask questions.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    58

    Default Re: Fixing Wall Corner Water Damage

    Thanks.

    Question:
    1. When you say 'side to side' do you mean cut the entire front piece of dry wall off?

    2. Do you just use a hacksaw to cut the drywall or does one need a special saw?

    Also, I don't see any 'corner bead' from the area that is exposed. I guess I'll get a better idea once I start cutting.

    I have watched a few DIY videos on Youtube and they mostly seem to involve 'corner bead' and 'mud'. But what I think I need is replacing a -section- of drywall---which seems to be a bit more 'advanced'. If there are any suggested videos or other instructions you can recommend, I'd really appreciate it.

    Cheers,

    ---JC

    Quote Originally Posted by dj1 View Post
    From the picture, you cut the drywall from side to side and as high as you need. Clean the studs, remove all nails/screws and corner beads. Remove the baseboard and put aside, if you are going to re-use it. Clean the framing and let dry.

    Cut a new piece of drywall to size and screw it on. All screws must go into studs. Install a new corner bead (metal or plastic). Tape , mud, sand, prime and paint.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,480

    Default Re: Fixing Wall Corner Water Damage

    Quote Originally Posted by suntower View Post
    Thanks.

    Question:
    1. When you say 'side to side' do you mean cut the entire front piece of dry wall off?

    2. Do you just use a hacksaw to cut the drywall or does one need a special saw?

    Also, I don't see any 'corner bead' from the area that is exposed. I guess I'll get a better idea once I start cutting.

    I have watched a few DIY videos on Youtube and they mostly seem to involve 'corner bead' and 'mud'. But what I think I need is replacing a -section- of drywall---which seems to be a bit more 'advanced'. If there are any suggested videos or other instructions you can recommend, I'd really appreciate it.

    Cheers,

    ---JC
    You need to remove what is damaged. Your pic shows the end of a wall, which is probably what DJ is referring to cutting from side to side. The rusty strips you see on either side, that is the existing metal corner bead.

    I would be inclined to cut the existing corner bead 6"-12" higher than where you see the rust bleeding through the drywall. Use a hacksaw for this. Corner bead is "L" shaped and wraps around the corner, extending out flat by about 1-1/4". The rust will continue to worsen and bleed through your drywall and paint, which is why I would remove as much of it as possible.

    The drywall itself can be cut with a drywall saw, coarse toothed keyhole saw, or by scoring through with a utility knife. A saw would be the easiest. You only need to remove what is damaged.


    The end cap of the wall is easy, simply cut the damage out and install new drywall with screws. It is fully supported, so no worries on how to attach it. Going down the lengths of the wall, you can do one of two things, cut the drywall back to the centerline of the next stud in the wall, or, only cut out the damage, then install a block as a backer to support the joint, either method is acceptable. For ease, you want to keep your cuts as straight as possible. Drywall screws will be the best choice for installing your new drywall, including installing the new corner bead.

    Use the fiber mesh joint tape, it is self adhesive and is much easier to use than paper tape. Use multipurpose joint compound to fill and float out the repair as smoothly as possible. Once you're happy with your work, you can apply texture to match, which looks like a blown on texture. The Homax texture kits work extremely well for small areas. You do not need to buy the Homax refills, you can mix your own from the left over joint compound, simply add a little water to the compound until it is just soupy enough to flow through the texture gun. I do not recommend the aerosol textures because you can't really control the size of the texture for perfect matching and blending.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Fixing Wall Corner Water Damage

    Thanks. Sorry for the slow reply. The 'notification' thingee didn't seem to work.

    Will give all this a try... wish me luck.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Fixing Wall Corner Water Damage

    So I actually -did- it. Easier than I thought. Well... structurally.

    But one last thing: I can't seem to get the corners to look nice. IOW: I put down the bead. And it's a little shallow... ie. you have to build up a couple of layers of joint compound. But the results are that the corners are wrinkly. ie. I can't seem to get a nice right angle.

    What's the trick? Do I need a better 'butter knife'? Or is there a technique?

    TIA,

    ---JC

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