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Thread: New stone patio

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    5

    Angry New stone patio

    I want to replace an old brick patio with bricks that are uneven, and unattractive. The space is about 500 sq ft. There are two trees located close to the house that will need to be removed. I need help in locating a reliable paving company in the Chicago area. Should I go directly to a big fancy paving company? I did visit several big box stores but the help was very limited. I also went ****** to one of the popular home services. I'm at a lost for where to start. Help!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,436

    Default Re: New stone patio

    Do you want to replace your brick patio with the same?

    The work involved is: remove old bricks, prepare the area and install new patio floor. Prep work is mighty important.

    Start by collecting names of contractors in this trade, ask them for estimates, get their references and verify them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: New stone patio

    I would advice you to look for a local contractor within your area. Some big companies may not offer you the kind of customer service that you desire simply because they already have dozens of customers with huge projects they have to focus on. Look for a local patio contractor with a good reputation and proven track record and you will be good to go. You can begin with a simple ****** search.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,321

    Default Re: New stone patio

    Whoever you get, be sure that they pay special heed to proper soil compaction, especially where the trees were. New soil should go in 'lifts' of no more than 6 inches, then compacted before adding the next 'lift' of soil. After leveling, the entire area will need to be compacted well before base material is added and the paver substrate begun. No matter how well the rest is done, lacking a stable and well compacted soil base will cause early shifting and failure.

    Being where you are there may be frost heave issues too, so best to try to find a contractor who will point you to several of his oldest jobs for you inspection- that way you can see how well they hold up over time. Anyone can make it look good today but it's supposed to last a lot longer than that, and that begins with careful attention to the basics.

    Phil

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