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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default Measuring a Door for an Uneven frame

    Hello,

    I recently moved into an old farm house. Years ago, an addition was added to the front, but apparently was not done well as it has sunk, creating pitched floors and uneven door frames. The doors most affected are the front door and bathroom door. For now, I'm concentrating on the bathroom door.

    The frame is not even. The floor is not even. The door barely fits. It grinds against the side and has gaps at the top and bottom. The door has a hole kicked in at the bottom and is just all around nasty. I want to replace it, but I have no idea how to measure a door to fit in such a sketchy frame. Obviously, since the door on there now doesn't fit, I can't just trace it either. Any tips would be greatly appreciated! I have some old doors that I can practice on too.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,084

    Default Re: Measuring a Door for an Uneven frame

    Here's what I would do:
    - remove the door and the door jamb.
    - fix (plumb) the rough opening, if you can.
    - get a pre-hung door that would fit in the rough opening. If the opening is 33x81, the correct door to get will be 32x80.

    If the floor sunk, most likely walls have sunk too, which means call a framer.
    You may have to trim a door to fit, by measuring at the bottom, middle and top.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,096

    Default Re: Measuring a Door for an Uneven frame

    First you need to address the real problem- the sunken foundations- then once you get things back to level replace the door. For the real toughies I make a template like the countertop installers do. Cut whatever scrap you have about 1/8" less than all 4 dimensions of the jamb (top, bottom and 2 sides) then nail or screw that together in place inside the jamb as you hold everything against it. Add a diagonal brace if it's flimsy. Place that on the new door and trace, allowing a bit less for the door margins. Scribe the hinge and strike locations on the pattern while you're in there. A perfect fit, first time every time, no matter how screwy the jamb is!

    Phil

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