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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    25

    Default toilet leaked into boiler room ceiling

    Hi,

    Awhile back a leak that had been going on for who know's how long was fixed where the toilet tank meets the bowl. Now the problem is the water had leaked into the insulation of the boiler room below it and it stinks of mold. I thought the mold had taken care of itself soon after the leak had been fixed but it's been making itself known more and more lately.

    The water got into the insulation by means of two parts of the linoleum behind the toilet not being well-sealed. Whoever put the linoleum down didn't do such a great job and left a strip in the middle behind the toilet which is now curled up abit.

    My question is, do I have to replace the insulation once it is removed from the boiler room ceiling? Is it needed for fire prevention? If I just get rid of it, am I placing myself in danger by not reinstalling new insulation?

    My landlady has ok'd hiring a day laborer to do the dirty work. I'm wondering if more professional help is needed, if I have to replace the insulation, or can anyone stuff new insulation back up? If so, do we need special insulation?

    Thanks for any help.

    Cheers,

    John L

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,004

    Default Re: toilet leaked into boiler room ceiling

    no insulation is needed at all. it was probably installed just to reduce the noise of the furnace running. it's important that you remove all the ceiling that has mold on it and you remove all the insulation to the point that you're sure it's not damp. mold, rarely, just goes away. it has to be removed. also, after you get everything removed, if the sub floor or the joists are damp, i wouldn't put the ceiling up for a day or two until everything dries out.

    lastly, it's imperative that you install 5/8" sheetrock on the ceiling above the furnace. it's required code for fire prevention.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: toilet leaked into boiler room ceiling

    Thank you very much. All very helpful info!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: toilet leaked into boiler room ceiling

    I have a few follow-up questions.

    There is also a propane line running somewhere in the walls and probably ceiling of the boiler room. I will look to see what I can tell about where it comes into the house in the boiler room but I am worried that an inadvertent nick on that line could cause, well, an explosion. How do I be sure that when taking down the sheetrock that's up there on ceiling now, that that line doesn't get damaged? I assume one would use a sheetrock knife to cut out the sheetrock. Could that damage a propane line? I am tempted to get a professional to do this rather than the handyman next door...

    Also, do I use any specific sheetrock to replace the old stuff? Is there some that is proper for the fire code? And what about having sheetrock makes things more fireproof? Is the idea that having a barrier gives you more time, slows the fire down?

    Thanks!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,598

    Default Re: toilet leaked into boiler room ceiling

    Quote Originally Posted by lipwak View Post
    I have a few follow-up questions.

    There is also a propane line running somewhere in the walls and probably ceiling of the boiler room. I will look to see what I can tell about where it comes into the house in the boiler room but I am worried that an inadvertent nick on that line could cause, well, an explosion. How do I be sure that when taking down the sheetrock that's up there on ceiling now, that that line doesn't get damaged? I assume one would use a sheetrock knife to cut out the sheetrock. Could that damage a propane line? I am tempted to get a professional to do this rather than the handyman next door...

    Also, do I use any specific sheetrock to replace the old stuff? Is there some that is proper for the fire code? And what about having sheetrock makes things more fireproof? Is the idea that having a barrier gives you more time, slows the fire down?

    Thanks!
    You don't use a utility knife to remove dry wall. Use a hammer.

    Besides, if your LP line is copper, it's pretty safe.

    Check your local code for the type of dry wall you need to install. Fire rated dry wall is type X.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: toilet leaked into boiler room ceiling

    Thanks! (adding characters so that this can be posted...)

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