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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    3

    Question Re: Questionable Porch Roof Replacement Method

    The contractor has called several times since Friday. I asked him more questions tonight and this is the information I gathered. There were 2 layers of roofing (as far as he could tell)- One green asphalt shingles and one rolled roof with a sealant added a few years ago. Also, between these layers there were some cedar shakes & 1/2" pine (?) strips used as shims. The original sheathing was tongue & groove. There were at least 3 places where the sheathing must have split/broken. Why did he decide to cover everything as described? 1) It would make a smoother & sturdier roof. 2) He felt there would be trouble with the rafters and the way they were attached to the brick wall. 3) He didn't want anything to happen to the ceiling over the porch. The plywood he used was 4 x 8 sheets of 1/2"OSB. If anyone now thinks he probably did the right thing, let me know. My insurance company says an adjuster would not cover a collapse if he feels it was not fixed properly and too much weight was added.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,969

    Default Re: Questionable Porch Roof Replacement Method

    The green shingles and single flat roofing should have been removed before anything was done. Any decent roofer should know that.

    1- That's just flat out wrong

    2- One has nothing to do with the other. See #1

    3- That makes 3 red flags

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,051

    Default Re: Questionable Porch Roof Replacement Method

    Everything you've described indicates that this "contractor", and I use the term extremely loosely in this instance, doesn't know his posterior from a rather deep and dark hole in the ground!

    1 - From the get-go, the issue needed to be assessed and a course of repair suggested. During this assessment, it should have been clear to even a reasonably experienced tradesman, that there were multiple layers and that opening up this can of worms would create a new can of worms.

    2 - As the repair began and more information was brought forward, this "contractor" should have discussed the new developments with you and suggested a course of action, even if that was for him to back away and bring in a certified roofer.

    What I can tell you without a doubt is that what has occurred to date is not the mark of someone who even remotely knows what they're doing, let alone anything close to industry standards (another term I hate extremely ). Whatever you do, do not call this individual back to continue work, and I would talk with your insurance agent/adjuster for a lead to a roofer whom they recommend to resolve this issue. At the very least, they don't have a lot of wiggle room if the roofer they recommend FUBAR's the job and they have to pay out. More importantly, you are more likely to get someone who is qualified to do this repair. It will likely be way more expensive and extensive than you expected, however, when it comes to roof work, it is far more important that the work be done properly than to try to skimp and save a buck with a cut rate idiot who doesn't know what they're doing.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,533

    Default Re: Questionable Porch Roof Replacement Method

    Run, don't walk to your lawyer and the state board of contractors.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,091

    Default Re: Questionable Porch Roof Replacement Method

    Quote Originally Posted by dj1 View Post
    Run, don't walk to your lawyer and the state board of contractors.

    THIS NOW. Stop talking to this guy and start talking with your lawyer or you're going to have some huge regrets, probably sooner than later. ACT NOW or you may lose the right to act. I don't give a rodent's behind what excuses this guy offers; he is flat-out wrong as you can see by all of us agreeing on that, and together you're looking at at least 100 years total of experience in the business here.

    Phil

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