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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    4

    Default Glass Block in Drywall

    I have a closet with a window and I want to let a little light come through the closet wall into the bedroom for light and for design.

    I want to install 5 or 6 single blocks between the studs in the drywall. One side of the wall is plasterboard, the other side is open and I will finish with drywall. How do I install a single block in the wall...it will look like 5 separate 8 inch portholes or windows?

    Thanks,
    Brad

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,004

    Default Re: Glass Block in Drywall

    sorry but i don't understand the question. what you described doesn't make sense to me. can you post a picture or go into more detail.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Glass Block in Drywall

    Quote Originally Posted by Bradw View Post
    I have a closet with a window and I want to let a little light come through the closet wall into the bedroom for light and for design.

    I want to install 5 or 6 single blocks between the studs in the drywall. One side of the wall is plasterboard, the other side is open and I will finish with drywall. How do I install a single block in the wall...it will look like 5 separate 8 inch portholes or windows?

    Thanks,
    Brad
    Here is a URL http://www.lushome.com/glass-block-w...co-homes/89495

    Look at about the 5th picture...colored individual blocks in a wall. Imagine this is an internal wall.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,767

    Default Re: Glass Block in Drywall

    MLB, I know what brad is asking, I read his question 3 times.

    Brad, this will require knowledge in framing and plastering.
    1. You need to cut holes in the plaster, large enough for the glass blocks.
    2. Frame around the blocks, notice how the blocks have space for a 2x to hold them in place.
    3. Finish the plaster around the blocks.

    You don't even have to drywall the rear side of the wall, the individual 'windows' will support the blocks in a safe manner.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,844

    Default Re: Glass Block in Drywall

    dj1 pretty much lays it out. Build a 2X frame tight around a block, cut a hole in the drywall the same size as the blocks lip. Instert the block in the drywall and use dry wall screws into the 2X frame to hold it in place.

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,969

    Default Re: Glass Block in Drywall

    If you can avoid the existing wall studs I'd be tempted to;

    1- Adhere a 4.5" wide piece of finished, painted wood to each side of the glass block.
    2- Cut a hole in the drywall slightly larger 1/8" than the exterior dimensions of the wood + glass assembly
    3- Miter J channel into a picture frame shape to slide over the cut edges of the drywall
    4- Slide the glass block into the hole, making it flush with each side (or wider / narrower depending on taste)
    5- Caulk the gaps closed.
    6- Paint.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,203

    Default Re: Glass Block in Drywall

    A bit late in getting here so I hope the OP is still in the planning stages. I'd take a different approach- you can buy flange-mount vinyl windows with 'glass-block' glazing. With a custom-sized one all you'd need to do is cut the correct opening in the drywall between the studs, cover the flange with trim, install a box-casing with trim on the other side, then paint. No mortar, no framing, little mess to clean up, and done in just a few hours or less based on your skill level.

    Sometimes you gotta think outside of the box (or closet as the case may be!)

    Phil

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