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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    5

    Default Painting kitchen cabinets

    I have oak cabinets in my kitchen. I decided to paint them white. I cleaned and sanded everything, put on 2 coats of Kilz high build primer, sanding in between. I had a nice surface ready to paint. I used Dunn Edwards Suprema interior latex semi-gloss. Putting Flotrol in the paint, I brushed the cabinet structure and got a beautiful finish. I had the cupboard doors sprayed painted (Dunn Edwards interior latex semi-gloss with no Flortrol in the paint) - what a disaster. The painter (I use the term loosely) sprayed, not with an airless sprayer, but with a spray gun using compressed air. The surface of the sprayed doors was not a hard gloss finish - it was rough and looked more like a satin finish - in some areas the surface looked like he sprayed over tapioca pudding - in other areas there was an orange peel look. (Not to mention the drips and fuzzies that were in the finish coat either from his gun or stuff in the air) Needless to say, I am sanding the cupboard doors down and brushing the paint on. I have about 30% the doors painted using the same can of paint (but with Flotrol added) that was used for spraying and I am getting a great hard semi-gloss finish. So it is not the paint.

    Does anyone know what went wrong with the spraying?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,101

    Default Re: Painting kitchen cabinets

    Sounds like his gun was 'spitting'. This is where the paint is not all atomized equally and some large-sized drops also spray out. A worn tip, improper thinning, too little air volume, too much cup pressure, the wrong tip size or type all can all cause this, but the usual culprit is not in the gun, it's in the air supply.

    A conventional sprayer needs a dry air supply, so you must have a good water filter or you'll get 'spitting'. The best spray finish can be had only with a conventional sprayer but using one is nearly an art form in comparison to other spray methods. Sorry that you found out the hard way that a lot of guy's don't really know what they're doing; skill trumps luck!

    Phil

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,363

    Default Re: Painting kitchen cabinets

    What Phil said plus,

    You'll be starting over with those doors. Sorry about that. Time to break out the sand paper.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Painting kitchen cabinets

    Quote Originally Posted by Mastercarpentry View Post
    Sounds like his gun was 'spitting'. This is where the paint is not all atomized equally and some large-sized drops also spray out. A worn tip, improper thinning, too little air volume, too much cup pressure, the wrong tip size or type all can all cause this, but the usual culprit is not in the gun, it's in the air supply.

    A conventional sprayer needs a dry air supply, so you must have a good water filter or you'll get 'spitting'. The best spray finish can be had only with a conventional sprayer but using one is nearly an art form in comparison to other spray methods. Sorry that you found out the hard way that a lot of guy's don't really know what they're doing; skill trumps luck!

    Phil


    Thanks for the info.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,585

    Default Re: Painting kitchen cabinets

    It is difficult to spray water based acrylic paints because the viscosity is just too heavy. If you thin it enough to spray well, you have corrupted the integrity of the paint.

    My first choice for spraying acrylic / latex paint would be an airless with the proper fine spray tip. A good airless can handle the heavier bodied paints without thinning.

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