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  1. #1
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    Jul 2013
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    Unhappy Painting window sills

    I need some advice on painting window sills in my 7 year old house. I have 4 small kids in the house and over time the window sills have gotten really grimy. I have tried sanding and repainting but now they are all tacky feeling and seem to absorb all dust and dirt. Is there a specific type of paint I should be using? What about a sealer? I am to the point of ripping them all out and replacing them with new ones that are stained. Help!!

  2. #2
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Painting window sills

    Not knowing what was previously used to paint the sills or what prep was done before you repainted, I would wash then down really well with a TSP solution, prime with Kilz or Zinnser Bull's Eye 123, then top coat with a good quality Alkyd paint. That should take care of all your issues.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Painting window sills

    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spruce View Post
    Not knowing what was previously used to paint the sills or what prep was done before you repainted, I would wash then down really well with a TSP solution, prime with Kilz or Zinnser Bull's Eye 123, then top coat with a good quality Alkyd paint. That should take care of all your issues.
    We had used a primer followed by a white semi gloss latex paint (and repainted).

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Painting window sills

    What kind of prep did you do?
    What kind of primer did you use?
    What brand of paint did you use?
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  5. #5
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    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
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    Default Re: Painting window sills

    Follow Spruce's advice. Latex/acrylic paints have an inherently gummy feel to them. Some household cleaners can attack them and leave them even more gummy feeling. Oil paints dry much harder and without that gummy feeling. Their main drawback is that they tend to yellow with age.

    If you stick with a latex paint, consider top coating them with a clear water based urethane varnish such as Minwax Polycrylic. The name is deceiving, it is not acrylic, but a water based urethane. The urethane top coating will stop that sticky feel and provide a more durable wiping surface immune to those household cleaners.

    There are also now some water based alkyd paints on the market. They supposedly give the advantages of both acrylic and oil paints. Home Depot is now selling such a paint in some markets. Sherwin-Willaims markets such a paint under the name ProMar 200.

  6. #6
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    Jul 2013
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    Default Re: Painting window sills

    Thanks guys! We are starting a small remodel in the house and I am going to check into Alkyd paints and I am also going to check into a tintable stain by Minwax. Polyurethane versus Polycrylic... will either one of these NOT yellow over time? Polycrylic is for paint and Polyurethane is for stain right? Thanks! (trying to weigh all options)

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Painting window sills

    Quote Originally Posted by cole82 View Post
    Thanks guys! We are starting a small remodel in the house and I am going to check into Alkyd paints and I am also going to check into a tintable stain by Minwax. Polyurethane versus Polycrylic... will either one of these NOT yellow over time? Polycrylic is for paint and Polyurethane is for stain right? Thanks! (trying to weigh all options)
    WARNING!!! MinWax Polyurethane is complete and utter garbage! It is hard to apply, even when done in accordance to the label it will bubble and fog. It is extremely hard to use and impossible to get good results from. If you're going to use a poly, use McCloskey's.

    Minwax stains are good, easy to use, etc. Use the liquid stains, gel stains don't work all that great, they don't have the penetrating power. Also, do not use stain poly all-in-one type finishes, they are like paint, if it gets chipped, you have bare, unstained wood under the finish. If you stain it and the finish gets chipped, you still have a perfectly colored item. Applying stain, then the finish coat is the way to go for best results.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  8. #8
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    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
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    Default Re: Painting window sills

    All oil based urethanes have a slight amber tone to them which can pull off the final color. The water based urethanes, such as Minwax "Polycrylic", will dry clear and stay that way over the years. Either can be used over a water based stain or an oil stain, once the stain is thoroughly dried.

    I would agree with Spruce on the combination stains such as Minwax PolyShades. on bare wood, it is better to use a penetrating stain, then a protective urethane varnish topcoat , either oil or water based.
    Last edited by ordjen; 07-18-2013 at 01:27 AM.

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