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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    Northern California
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    49

    Default Hanging Salvaged Cabinet (safely)

    I'd appreciate advice as to how to mount a 50-lb (?) wooden cabinet safely to the wall.

    There is a center stud running down the wall I want to secure cabinet to (which is covered by 5/8" sheetrock), and there's also a diagonal stud I might be able to find back there, which I could additionally attach cabinet to at some spot (maybe). Will post pic of wall interior pre-remodel in follow-up post.

    I want top of cabinet to line up on same level with the top of the door frame at the left....so cannot access the header higher up in wall for nailing (which is covered by 3/4" wood cornice, anyway.

    (If cabinet image doesn't appear, you can see it at Photobucket HERE Sadly, I'm still having trouble inserting images into posts here at TOH : (

    Or, cut + paste:

    http://i376.photobucket.com/albums/o...-10cabinet.jpg



    Anyway, here was my instinctual plan of attack:

    • Take off bottom of cabinet, where there is that 8" section of waste-space "box" that appears to have been added later. (I can see clumsy seam running along side of cabinet where it was apparently tacked on.) This would make cabinet slightly lighter, and leave more space on tabletop, which will be sitting below cabinet.


    • Remove plywood backing, which is thin.


    • Wedge some sturdy-ish strips of wood (3 total), centered within the shelf spaces, running vertically. Put glue on ends first, and nail in place from top and bottom of existing shelves, as accessible.


    • Replace back of cabinet with 3/4" plywood, gluing and nailing all around so very tight and secure.


    • Screw cabinet into stud, maybe 2 heavy screws per shelf space, through the newly secured strips of wood running up the back at the center. (So this would be 6 thick screws, running vertically through piece.)


    • Ideally, try to calculate where diagonal stud is, and see if it intersects cabinet. Screw into that as well, if possible (just through new plywood backing)


    • Possible attach 1" X 1" strip to bottom of cabinet where it meets wall, to create a tiny additional shelf of support beneath (?) Screw through this into stud.


    Am I making this more complicated than it has to be? I'm just worried that as I add books and china onto these shelves, the whole thing will come flying off the wall or something, and kill my dog!

    Suggestions? Warnings?

    Thanks for reading this : ) I've always appreciated the tips and dialogue I've received here.
    Last edited by California_Cookie; 06-10-2013 at 06:33 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Northern California
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    49

    Default Re: Hanging Salvaged Cabinet (safely)

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    HERE is a pic of the wall interior, beneath sheetrock, if anyone charitable is interested : )

    Or cut + paste:

    http://i376.photobucket.com/albums/o...wallbydoor.jpg

    THANK YOU........
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    Last edited by California_Cookie; 06-10-2013 at 06:36 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,940

    Default Re: Hanging Salvaged Cabinet (safely)

    That cabinet is wide enough that it should span at least two, if not three, studs. If there are no horizontal cleats within the cabinet, then install two, one at the bottom and top of the cabinet box. Use glue and nails or screws through the cabinet into the cleats inside the cabinet box, at least one fastener from each end and several along the length. When the glue is dry, mark stud locations on the cleats, pre-drill holes for screws. use cabinet mounting screws and mount the cabinet. One screw at each corner of the cabinet into the wall will be sufficient to secure the cabinet and support any amount of weight you'll be inclined to put into it.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Northern California
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    49

    Default Re: Hanging Salvaged Cabinet (safely)

    The cabinet is not wide enough to span 2 studs....there's only 1 stud in the center of that particular wall section. (Also a bit of overlap with the diagonal one on lower right side?)

    SEE: http://i376.photobucket.com/albums/o...wallbydoor.jpg


    If I add 1 horizontal cleat inside the box at the top, and 1 horizontal at the bottom, then will 2 cabinet screws hold it, in the center(s)?

    Does it add any support to drill through the far ends of the cleats through the sheetrock, using some kind of toggle screws that open up behind the sheetrock?

    I really think I only have that center stud to work with...
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    Last edited by California_Cookie; 06-10-2013 at 10:04 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,774

    Default Re: Hanging Salvaged Cabinet (safely)

    You are planning on replacing the back with 3/4" plywood so a screw near the top and one near the bottom should be more than sufficient.

    I don't understand why you want to split the shelves into cubby holes.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Northern California
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    49

    Default Re: Hanging Salvaged Cabinet (safely)

    Quote Originally Posted by JLMCDANIEL View Post
    You are planning on replacing the back with 3/4" plywood so a screw near the top and one near the bottom should be more than sufficient....I don't understand why you want to split the shelves into cubby holes.
    Jack
    Okay....you have made me think of an (obvious) thing. As long as the new plywood back is thick enough, AND it is very very securely attached to the body of the cabinet all the way around, then screwing through that into the stud will keep it all up, even if it's heavy.

    The wood I was going to attach vertically down the middle of the shelf backs was going to be about 2 inches wide by maybe 3/4 inch thick. For some reason, that image made (a sort of) sense at the time...the idea of kind of "sandwiching" the new back between the stud, underneath, and this strip of new wood on the front. But it wouldn't have been a thick enough piece of wood to reach the front of the shelves, and create cubbie holes.

    Okay...it was an unnecessary idea

    I think I sort of want to overbuild things that go on walls, because I really have no practical idea how much weight screws and cleats (of whatever thickness) actually support. By the same token, when I pick up a big framed mirror, like I hung yesterday, I can't really gauge HOW heavy it is...it just seems MORE than heavy enough to dash someone's brains out if it came loose!

    So, I'm always nervous putting big things on the wall. Especially in California, where we have earthquakes!

    Thank you both for your ideas : )
    Last edited by California_Cookie; 06-11-2013 at 01:42 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
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    5,774

    Default Re: Hanging Salvaged Cabinet (safely)

    What you have to remember is you are dealing with shear strength of the screws.

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,905

    Default Re: Hanging Salvaged Cabinet (safely)

    When I can't attach a wall cabinet to enough studs to suit me, I will locate the stud edges exactly by driving a finish nail through the wall surface where it will cover on installation. Then instead of 1 screw in the center I use two screws angled toward the center where they will just get inside the stud edge at the surface and hit center or past at the point. One screw is higher than the other to eliminate cleat splitting. That effectively doubles the holding but then in your case you're putting it all on one stud which may tend to bow from the weight in time. Using toggles or mollys at the outer corners will help in this case.

    If it is practical I'd also sneak a thin bead of construction adhesive where the cabinet walls meet the house walls to gain a little more vertical holding power. I also have some 6 inch screws in my cabinet box that will often allow me to reach over to another wall stud. Those alone won't hold much but they go a long way to helping keep the main screws from twisting. Remember to not over-tighten the screws as the 3/4 cleat can split leaving you with almost nothing holding the cabinet up. You might consider using washers under the heads to spread the clamping load on the cleat. Always use washers on screws with more than a slight angle from perpendicular. In rentals where someone may overload a weakly-mounted cabinet I remove some or all the shelves to discourage that- they won't stack much before storing the stuff elsewhere since it will fall out if they do.

    Phil

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