+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    5

    Default How to determine if old lap siding is salvegable

    Longtime reader but new poster here. My wife and I recently purchased an early 1940s home in NC. I've done a lot of research on the house. By the 1950s, the lap siding (yellow pine), was covered with asbestos shingles, which are still on the house. This was presumably done not because of decay of the pine, but because it was an alternative to paint. In a few places, the lap siding is exposed and appears to be in really good shape. I'm considering having the asbestos removed, but wanted a little more info about how to determine if the original siding is salvageable. I'd appreciate any tips.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,509

    Default Re: How to determine if old lap siding is salvegable

    You inspect it, or have it inspected by a pro.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,039

    Default Re: How to determine if old lap siding is salvegable

    If the original siding has had asbestos tiles grafted to it, then it will be riddled with nail holes once the asbestos is removed. What this means is more prep in the way of filler and sanding to restore the original siding to a paintable surface. Can it be salvaged, that would remain to be seen once the asbestos was removed and the condition can be accurately assessed.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: How to determine if old lap siding is salvegable

    Thanks for the feedback. I understand that I'd be looking at a lot of prep time if salvageable, and there would be a lot of nail holes. Generally speaking, is there a definable threshold that a pro painter or contractor will use to assess whether the siding is worth attempting to work with? Age? Degree of splitting? If the wood is hard, shows no sign of rot, should the amount of nail holes be a major concern?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,039

    Default Re: How to determine if old lap siding is salvegable

    Quote Originally Posted by vannakin View Post
    Generally speaking, is there a definable threshold that a pro painter or contractor will use to assess whether the siding is worth attempting to work with?
    That is an incredibly hard question to answer, as we all have our "pain" threshold. Some wouldn't touch your project with a 10 foot pole, others will jump at the chance. As long as you understand what you're getting into, proceed, interview at least 3 different contractors, and make sure that their bids are for the same work. It does no good for one guy to quote paint only, the next removing the asbestos and then painting, and the third guy to reside and paint the entire house.

    The big unknown is the extent of the damage under the asbestos siding. Certainly, there will be nail damage, frequently, when a house is over-clad with new siding it is to hide moderate to severe issues, such as rot. Another frequent issue is the over-clad siding has leaked and the original siding takes the brunt of the water, which has now rotted because it can't breath and shed the moisture.

    When you interview potential contractors, have a list of necessities written down that you want each of them to address, such as removal of the asbestos siding, filling the nail holes and general paint prep, and finally, repainting. There is no way to estimate what you can't see, so trying to ballpark dryrot damage, etc., will be impossible until the asbestos tile is removed. The key is the known necessities, given a perfect scenario.

    Asbestos, technically, requires a certified contractor to abate, even siding, so be prepared for that. You can get around this technicality by stripping the tiles yourself, however, if you do this, please at least take some personal safety precautions with suitable attire and protective gear, and dispose of the debris as per local regulations.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: How to determine if old lap siding is salvegable

    My 65 year old neighbor moved into his house with his parents in the mid-1950s, inherited it, and now lives there. According to him and one other neighbor, the lap siding was in pristine condition when it was covered.

    I've already got estimates on asbestos removal. I removed a small section myself beside the chimney and porch where there was rot and have torn out the badly damaged old sheathing and siding. But this was the only place where there appears to be damage. We rent the property now. I've been restoring it. After recently removing some of the window trim to examine the frames and casings, I've found very little damage to them, and again, the siding looks good around them.

    Let me frame my question another way. I'm in Raleigh, NC, so it's humid. If yellow pine put on in 1941 was in good condition in the mid-1950s when it was covered, and it has not been exposed to water damage, is it likely that I would find salveable material? The asbestos shingles are the large 12 x 24 pieces. GAF now makes a fiber cement substitute for these. I know they hold paint well, aren't harmful when in tact, but they're also ugly in my opinion. We're eligible for 30% state historic tax credits because the house is located in a historic district.

    Go for the removal and restoration, understanding that you may have to reside, or not?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    295

    Default Re: How to determine if old lap siding is salvegable

    The fact that this is a rental has an impact if it were my project.

    I actually have a similar situation I plan to tackle in two years or so, the rectangular tile w/ asbestos over wood lap circa 1900 or so. Tile was added at an unknown time, tarpaper placed over original siding. Every time I cut a hole in my walls and look at the siding the back of the original looks good, but I have to accept that 90% of my siding may be rotten and have to live under that assumption until the asbestos is removed. I can only be pleasantly surprised if things are in good shape. 50 years of hidden surface means you have no idea what is under there and any assumptions will be defeated by Murphy's Law.

    Regarding the asbestos tile, I will tell you what a contractor I know of told me I should never ever do, and you should never ever do this yourself if you catch where I am going.
    Hire a few guys, be it the painters or just laborers, to do your demo starting the Friday afternoon before a holiday weekend. The demo likely will not take more than two days unless your place is huge, get it done fast, and arrange for disposal. Local code enforcement will likely not work past noon the Friday before a holiday. You will have some cleanup if you hired hurried labor, so have fun with all of the nails on the ground.
    Again, you should not do that, it may skirt the limits of legality.



    Personally I plan to do my own demo for everything but a small section that is above the original roofline as I feel I can tackle one wall a weekend. The tiles are actually inert and harmless unless broken and the asbestos fibers become airborne.
    It's this old house, not this built after your dad was born house.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: How to determine if old lap siding is salvegable

    [QUOTE=function;278921]The fact that this is a rental has an impact if it were my project.

    ^ Meaning, that since it's a rental you'd reside after a few years of income?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    295

    Default Re: How to determine if old lap siding is salvegable

    [QUOTE=vannakin;278923]
    Quote Originally Posted by function View Post
    The fact that this is a rental has an impact if it were my project.

    ^ Meaning, that since it's a rental you'd reside after a few years of income?

    If you plan to move in, absolutely make the house everything you want. If you plan to rent the house permanently, I would(and this is just my opinion as a random putz with a lot of ideas but less experience) simply make the house structurally sound and water resistant in an economical manner that keeps the house from being an eyesore.
    It's this old house, not this built after your dad was born house.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,509

    Default Re: How to determine if old lap siding is salvegable

    I disagree with function. Asbestos has to be removed and disposed of the right way, the legal way. Income property or your residence - doesn't matter.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •