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  1. #1
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    Apr 2013
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    Default Kitchen stove and microwave tend to lose power even when no storms are in the area

    For some reason, the kitchen items tend to lose power when there is no storms in the area.
    The dishwasher, microwave and stove tend to lose power from time to time even when there are no storms in the area, the rest of the house lose power like everyone else when storm is around..

    Breaker is never tripped when this happens, i know this can be a number of things, but before i get electrician out to check everything out, id like to be some what up to speed on some causes so i know im not being taken by someone saying i need to rewire everything..

    We will be remodeling the kitchen within the next 2 yrs, but in the mean time, i dont want to let it continue if it can cause issues or even fire in the house..

    Is there anything visually i can check to see if maybe there is a true sign something needs replacing? Breaker? maybe faulty outlet?

    I have the simple outlet testers which i believe the last time i checked everything in the kitchen was fine. But will probably check again.

    Any things to check would be great so im informed before someone comes to check it out.

  2. #2
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    Dec 2007
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    Tennessee
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    Default Re: Kitchen stove and microwave tend to lose power even when no storms are in the are

    Is this a gas stove? I ask because a gas stove would use 110 for the controls where an electric stove would be 220. A gas stove could be on the same breaker as the dishwasher and microwave, but an electric stove would be on a separate circuit.

    Assuming a gas stove, does the power come back all by itself or do you have to do something? Are you sure that you are not losing power to one or more of your bathrooms or any outdoor outlets? It is important to check these when the kitchen looses power.

    How often does this happen? When it happens, are you in the middle of using one or more of these appliances?

  3. #3
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    Apr 2013
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    Default Re: Kitchen stove and microwave tend to lose power even when no storms are in the are

    Is this a gas stove? Yes gas stove with simple digital display for time and temp.

    Assuming a gas stove, does the power come back all by itself or do you have to do something? Nothing has to be done, its almost more of a brown out affect. We can set the clocks on both units and come back after work and they are blinking and the dishwasher lights are blinking also.


    Are you sure that you are not losing power to one or more of your bathrooms or any outdoor outlets? Not sure since it happens when no one is around and there is nothing in the bathrooms to indicate that power was lost in there. I guess i can get few alarm clocks and connect in there and see if they lose the time also.

    How often does this happen? Hard to say, cause when it happens we tend to not set the clocks and have the dreaded blinking times on them.

    When it happens, are you in the middle of using one or more of these appliances? It has happened before but its rare that we use more than 2 appliances at the same time, BUT we do have a counter top oven that we use and if someone uses the microwave it will trip the circuit. Now wife says that she cant use all three at the same time.. doing that actually trips the breaker, but the other issue is that from time to time the power is lost and causes the appliances to lose time and blink(in this case, the breaker is not tripped)

  4. #4
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    May 2008
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    Default Re: Kitchen stove and microwave tend to lose power even when no storms are in the are

    I take it all of these appliances are on the same circuit?

    It sounds to me like a loose connection. You'll need to check all of the connections on that circuit, from the breaker panel (both the hot/black wire attached to the breaker and the neutral/white wire attached to the busbar) to every light switch, receptacle, and junction box on that circuit.

    The loose connection could be a loose screw on the side of a "daisy-chained" receptacle. It's common for electricians to bring a wire into a box, attach it directly to the receptacle, then attach another wire to the receptacle to continue to the next receptacle, and so on. A loose screw on a single receptacle can affect every receptacle and light downstream. That's why I recommend connecting the wires using wire nuts and running a jumper from the wire nut to the receptacle.

    Another possibility similar to the previous paragraph is that instead of using the screws, the electrician used the "backstab" connections that depend on spring pressure from an internal tab to make the connection. There are a lot of people and electricians that don't trust these connections.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Tennessee
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    Default Re: Kitchen stove and microwave tend to lose power even when no storms are in the are

    I would start by replacing the circuit breaker. Even if all three appliances are on at the same time, it should not trip a good breaker. I would be a little concerned about the countertop oven on the same circuit though, that is a heavy load. It needs to be on a circuit with a 20 amp circuit breaker, and that circuit needs to be sized for the 20 amp breaker.

    Worse case, the buss bar that the circuit breaker is attached to could be pitted or corroded to the point that it is getting very hot. It can break the connection without tripping the breaker and it causes the breaker to get hot, making it easier to trip with a smaller load. That might mean that you will need a new service panel installed and that will get a little pricy, but if it is needed, you are at risk for a house fire if you don't get the work done.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Columbiana, Alabama
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    623

    Default Re: Kitchen stove and microwave tend to lose power even when no storms are in the are

    Quote Originally Posted by Fencepost View Post
    I take it all of these appliances are on the same circuit?

    It sounds to me like a loose connection. You'll need to check all of the connections on that circuit, from the breaker panel (both the hot/black wire attached to the breaker and the neutral/white wire attached to the busbar) to every light switch, receptacle, and junction box on that circuit.

    The loose connection could be a loose screw on the side of a "daisy-chained" receptacle. It's common for electricians to bring a wire into a box, attach it directly to the receptacle, then attach another wire to the receptacle to continue to the next receptacle, and so on. A loose screw on a single receptacle can affect every receptacle and light downstream. That's why I recommend connecting the wires using wire nuts and running a jumper from the wire nut to the receptacle.

    Another possibility similar to the previous paragraph is that instead of using the screws, the electrician used the "backstab" connections that depend on spring pressure from an internal tab to make the connection. There are a lot of people and electricians that don't trust these connections.
    All good points Fencepost. Also:

    1) there are a number of devices on the market that can simply be plugged into an outlet and read voltage;

    2) if the OP will simply run their hand up and down the front of each breaker, receptacle and switch. If one feels hot to the touch it may be the cause of the problem and will speed up an electricians work; I once found a defective receptacle this way...it was running about 275 deg. F and lights across the room were dimming.

    3) turn off each breaker one at a time and list the lights, receptacles and appliances which are affected. also place the breaker number, with masking tape, on these items

    4) an accurate log of what was on at the time and what circuit they were on would also be very helpful...doing so, you may actually find the problem yourself!
    Good Luck from Columbiana, Alabama
    Maurice Turgeon, Hidden Content

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    18

    Default Re: Kitchen stove and microwave tend to lose power even when no storms are in the are

    Thank you all for your suggestions and opinions..
    Looks like i have some investigation to do..

    Now the loose screw, to me sounds more possible, as i know that alot if not all the outlets in the house were replaced byt the previous home owner themselves. So how to tell if they used the right types of recepticles in the kitchen or house for that matter?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Columbiana, Alabama
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    623

    Default Re: Kitchen stove and microwave tend to lose power even when no storms are in the are

    Quote Originally Posted by cubangt View Post
    Thank you all for your suggestions and opinions..
    Looks like i have some investigation to do..

    Now the loose screw, to me sounds more possible, as i know that alot if not all the outlets in the house were replaced byt the previous home owner themselves. So how to tell if they used the right types of recepticles in the kitchen or house for that matter?
    Virtually all receptacles in the US are UL listed. They may not be the latest and greatest (tamper resistant, or weather resistant, for use outside) but what you have should be fine.

    Initially, a loose screw will produce heat under load, in all devices, which are not designed to consume power. So, any switch, receptacle and even circuit breaker should not feel hot to-the-touch and should be your first suspect. If you have a 3 lamp tester, do what I do, insert it in the receptacle and wiggle it around. If lights dim you've found the bad one. In some cases, it may not even look bad, but should be replaced.

    If a loose connection has progressed to the point that an arc-over has occured and welded back, when power flows in the connection and at a later date it may "glow" red hot, further destroy the connection and often start a fire. The "glowing connection" is hot enough to melt all plastics and ignite wooden studs. It is the worse possible electrical condition there is.

    Combination Arc Fault Current Interruptors (AFCI) circuit breakers have been required in all new installations since 2011 and are designed to trip when such conditions are detected. Unfortunately, it's a very difficult task and many electricians don't believe in them.

    Although they cost about $40 each, you may want to insist that an electrician install them on all 120V 15A and 20A circuits in your panel, especially with the problems you've described.
    Good Luck from Columbiana, Alabama
    Maurice Turgeon, Hidden Content

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