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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    3

    Unhappy Serious Drop in Water Pressure

    I have a 2-story, 2400 sq ft home that was built in 1987 with what appears to be 3/4" copper pipes for the water. When ever a toilet is flushed, the washer is filling up, or the shower is running, there is a serious drop in pressure. There is no filtration system and we are on city water. A check of the pressure shows it to be at 120 psi then drops to 20 psi if toilet is flushed, remaining there until it is full, and then the psi returns to the 120. Suggestions on where to start on this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,323

    Default Re: Serious Drop in Water Pressure

    120 pressure inside the home is way too high. Do you have a pressure regulator/reducer? it's probably not functioning.
    Have it checked. Where do you measure the pressure? There is a way to reduce the pressure on the reducer, Should be between 50 and 70. If the pressure doesn't go down, replace the reducer.

    Once you do that see if the pressure stays the same.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Serious Drop in Water Pressure

    Thanks for the reply.....


    Glad you confirmed for me that the pressure is too high, I thought that as well from what I've gathered through reading many, many posts.

    I live at the bottom of a hill and yes I have a regulator on the line. I can adjust it up or down. I tested the pressure on an outside spicket. My neighbor says he had similar problems and was told to turn off the main and then drain the system to see if that 'loosened any deposits' in his regulator. It did not solve his problem and he ended up replacing it. Think that's worth a shot?

    Appreciate your help.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,323

    Default Re: Serious Drop in Water Pressure

    I would say replace the regulator.

    You might want to call your water company to find out what is the water pressure in the street (or at the meter). In hilly areas, the pressure is higher, but this high pressure kills the reducers. That's one of the costs of living in a hilly area. I own a rental house in a hilly area, and I replace the reducer every 5-6 years. For me it's a deductible expense.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Serious Drop in Water Pressure

    Thanks DJ...I'll replace it and see where that get's me.

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