+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    212

    Lightbulb Re: What Did They Use?

    THANKS Clarence, I have a Lowes down the road and will check to see what they have.

    While looking for the "green" sponge I came across THIS article. It looks very similar to what I have. The biggest surprise is that they didn't use a trowel or grout float. They used a 7" brush

    It's called "SAND SWIRL" and they use something called Perlite. I haven't read the whole article but it seems very similar from what I've read so far.

    Has anyone here ever used this Perlite? Could I just mix some sand with the paint to get a similar appearance? If so, then what kind of sand would be best to use?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    326

    Default Re: What Did They Use?

    Stay away from paint mixing with sand.
    Perlite is aggregate used in light weight plaster.
    Look for USG Structo- Lite plaster or **** bond Gypsolite plaster these will only require water to be added color is light Grey.
    If it is over sheet rock and not more than 1/16 to 1/8 inch thickness use joint compound and add sand trowel on let it get firm to the touch and float it.
    You can also use USG Diamond finish and add sand trowel & float as above.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    212

    Question Re: What Did They Use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Clarence View Post
    If it is over sheet rock and not more than 1/16 to 1/8 inch thickness use joint compound and add sand trowel on let it get firm to the touch and float it.
    So I would mix the joint compound with the paint, or apply joint compound and then paint afterwards?

    If I mix it, then what ratio of joint compound to paint?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    326

    Default Re: What Did They Use?

    DON'T USE ANY PAINT
    mixing paint with plaster / Joint compound will cause the product to FAIL.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    212

    Question Re: What Did They Use?

    Don't use paint?

    Could you please be more specific? Do you mean don't use paint WITH the plaster (mixed) or don't use paint period (painting over the plaster)?

    If I can't use paint period then I'll need to use something else other than plaster, because the whole point of the repair is to refinish the walls finish. Thanks.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: What Did They Use?

    Looks to be either a stucco finish that was directly applied over the cement or a sand mixture. The circular motion you see is from the application of the product - probably using a trowel. I wouldn't worry too much about the coloration as you can paint over sand/cement and stucco finish is available in several colors these days. Try to do a color match, a company called STO offers different grit finishes and decorative options. You could also try chipping off a good size portion (usually comes apart attached to the fiber mesh that's hopefully installed behind it) so you can have them match it at your local home improvement store.

    Best of luck!

    ~Retroloco-LJ

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: What Did They Use?

    Quote Originally Posted by MyMilan View Post
    I've never seen Stucco before but I have heard about it. I always thought that Stucco was applied over a wire mesh around 1/2 inch thick. This (whatever I have) is applied over regular drywall and is only the thickness of regular paint. Is it still considered Stucco?

    If so, then how would you repair a Stucco wall so that the finish is uniform? With a sponge?
    That is stucco. It was applied with a trowel and a float finish. Back then they did not use smooth out the surface to removed the float marks. If you are ever at home depot go into trowel section and you will see different color floats with handles. They use the course green float. Today's application consist of opening surface up with green and knocking down with white. Hope this helps you

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: What Did They Use?

    Quote Originally Posted by MyMilan View Post
    I can find a rubber sponge grout float at local Home Depot, but not a "green" sponge float. Is there something special about the green sponge ones that I need?

    I was thinking of diluting some sheet rock mud with water and mixing it with the paint, and then applying in one quarter circular motions. I'm not doing the whole wall, just in spots where the wall was repaired. I agree it was not painted on. They used some sort of trowel or groat float.
    I posted earlier about green float. You have to look by the drywall tools/ concrete area to find it.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    212

    Lightbulb Re: What Did They Use?

    Quote Originally Posted by JBM0521 View Post
    If you are ever at home depot go into trowel section and you will see different color floats with handles. They use the course green float.
    Yep, always there. I'll go there tonight and get a green float. THANKS!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: What Did They Use?

    Quote Originally Posted by JBM0521 View Post
    That is stucco. It was applied with a trowel and a float finish. Back then they did not use smooth out the surface to removed the float marks. If you are ever at home depot go into trowel section and you will see different color floats with handles. They use the course green float. Today's application consist of opening surface up with green and knocking down with white. Hope this helps you
    Now that i have read more. If it is over drywall like you say and about 1/4 thick it is A venetian plaster. Go to sherwin williams and look at the different textures they have. Match color and your all set to apply. They will be able to show you float used to get swirl marks.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •