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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    3

    Default Cutting Thick Wood

    Hi,
    I'm in the process of using bowling alley remnants for vanity tops and need to cut 19" circles through 3 inches of maple that is nailed together. It sounds painful just typing it.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    7,974

    Default Re: Cutting Thick Wood

    3" is quite a thickness to get a saw through. What you'll likely have to do is draw your cut line, then drill a series of holes around the perimeter, then use a jig saw or sawzall to finish the cut. If you want a perfect hole, you can clean it up with a belt sander.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    3

    Default Re: Cutting Thick Wood

    Thanks spruce, that's kinda what I was thinking. I didn't know If I was missing something in the wonderful new tool realm.

    Thanks.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,974

    Default Re: Cutting Thick Wood

    Well, the standard tool for cutting sink hole in a formica or wood top (generally about 1" thick ) is a jigsaw, but a jigsaw only has about a 1-1/2" maximum capacity. You'd be pretty hard pressed to be able to cut from both sides to make the cut-out, hence drilling the series of holes. I'd use at least a 1/2" bit, probably a 3/4" would be better. Drill the holes just inside your actual cut line and you can either overlap the holes slightly or leave a small space between that you go back and cut out with the sawzall You might be able to find an extra long blade for the jigsaw, but it's doubtful. Once you've got the major waste removed, you can clean up the edges with a sharp wood chisel or probably fanaggle a belt sander around the hole and buff the wane down to the actual cut line.

    Something that has occurred to me is that with a 3" thick top, you're going to have difficulty finding a faucet that will mount up to it. You're going to have to either counter-sink the mounting location from underneath, or find a faucet with extra long mounting studs. It might be easiest to set up a jig and route out the underside of the top until you get it down to about 1-1/2" finished thickness. This will aid in mounting the sink and faucet both. One word of caution, however, before you take a router to it, make sure to check the material with a magnet to make sure there are no internal metal fasteners that will cause damage or injury when hit with a router. It wouldn't be a bad idea to check before drilling and cutting as well.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    158

    Default Re: Cutting Thick Wood

    Only nailed together?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    6,017

    Default Re: Cutting Thick Wood

    Lenox makes a couple of 4" bi metal jigsaw blades made to cut nail embedded wood. http://www.lenoxtools.com/enUS/Produ...aw_blades.html
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Cutting Thick Wood

    Sorry...glued and nailed.

    ***! I didn't give any consideration to the faucet. They'll be attaching to the sink which I believe will fall inside the cutout. Hmmm. I'll have to verify that. I'll start my hole drilling torture tomorrow.

    Thanks for the feed back.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,974

    Default Re: Cutting Thick Wood

    Good find Jack, just what the doctor ordered. I'd still recommend drilling the series of holes so that you're not cutting all that material. It's hard enough to keep a jigsaw cutting perpendicular and along a line as it is, that thick of material will make it darned near impossible.

    Quote Originally Posted by hamakiman View Post
    ***! I didn't give any consideration to the faucet. They'll be attaching to the sink which I believe will fall inside the cutout. Hmmm. I'll have to verify that. I'll start my hole drilling torture tomorrow.

    Thanks for the feed back.
    If it attaches to the sink, then you shouldn't have any issues, however, when cutting the hole you may need to hog out a little extra around the back so that you can get your hands and wrenches in there to attach the faucet and hoses. Not sure how you'll be holding the sink in place, if you're using clips, you'll have to come up with something else.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

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