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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    2

    Default Bathroom Exhaust Fan

    I have a bathroom on the top floor of my house, It has a window but no exhaust fan. I noticed a problem with cracking paint. So I want to install a fan. I have two choices to mount the fan either on a exterior wall or ceiling but since the bathroom is part of a dormer, the ceiling only has a stud cavity to mount the fan; I also run into the same problem with the wall. Also the walls are plaster so no matter what this wont be easy. Do they sell fans that fit into that small space and also how do I run the duct pipe in such a small space?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,480

    Default Re: Bathroom Exhaust Fan

    It won't be easy, but you can still install the fan within a stud/joist bay, you just build yourself a spacer to make up the difference between the cavity depth and what you need to house the fan body. I did this recently in a home that was formerly a flat roof and had no space for the fan. I simply made a wooden box that filled the gap between the lip of the fan housing and the surface of the ceiling. The box was attached to the framing, the housing was attached to the box. It worked out great and looked good too.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Bathroom Exhaust Fan

    So your saying you built a wood box that mounted to the ceiling and put the fan in that box and ran the duct through the box and then out the roof. Is there anyway you could post pictures of that? Also if I wanted to do this on the wall how far below the soffit do you mount the vent I am sure there must be a code for that.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,480

    Default Re: Bathroom Exhaust Fan

    It was actually more of a frame, not a box. Basically, the housing was 2" deeper than the ceiling cavity, so I built a "picture frame", if you will, to act as a spacer between the ceiling and the housing. All the duct work was up inside the ceiling cavity and was not affected by the spacer that I installed.

    Can't help with the wall mounted fans, I've seen them, but I've never installed one.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: Bathroom Exhaust Fan

    Quote Originally Posted by brale76578 View Post
    I have a bathroom on the top floor of my house, It has a window but no exhaust fan. I noticed a problem with cracking paint. So I want to install a fan. I have two choices to mount the fan either on a exterior wall or ceiling but since the bathroom is part of a dormer, the ceiling only has a stud cavity to mount the fan; I also run into the same problem with the wall. Also the walls are plaster so no matter what this wont be easy. Do they sell fans that fit into that small space and also how do I run the duct pipe in such a small space?
    Something that might be both beneficial and aesthetically pleasing is a window. By the sounds of your situation it may even be the easier way to go. Just make sure to insulate properly.
    Don't kill the dream, execute it.

    Retroloco-LJ
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