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Thread: Outdoor Faucet

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default Outdoor Faucet

    I just had my house sided and the company boxed in my faucet. Because they went over the existing shingles, the spout is up against the box and I cannot connect a hose to it. A picture is attached. Is there some type of extension kit between where the pipe comes out of through the wall of the house and the faucet??? Your input is greatly appreciated!
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,381

    Default Re: Outdoor Faucet

    You have a frost resistant faucet. The good news is that they come in various stem lengths so it is not to difficult to replace.

    But a lot depends on the construction of your house and what the builder did for the piece that the faucet screws into. Some of these faucets have a male fitting, some have a female. The piece that it screws into should be secured to a frame member.

    Getting to the end of this faucet to inspect before attempting to replace it may be difficult. If you are on a conventional foundation and the faucet comes through the rim joist, then you can crawl under the house and look. You may be able to secure the adapter if it is not already secured.

    If you are on a slab and the faucet is coming out through an exterior wall of the house, it gets a lot more difficult. Usually in these cases, the faucet is directly in line with an interior dividing wall, often one of the bathroom walls where there is already water. You can take a chance by cutting off the water to the house and then just twisting off the faucet, then go to the hardware store and buy one 2" longer that matches the one you have and hope that nothing goes wrong. If something goes wrong, it will have to be fixed before you can turn the water back on. Do you feel lucky?

    Otherwise you can cut out some sheetrock at the faucet level in the dividing wall, see what size new faucet you will need, secure any fittings and have everything ready to go so the water will only be off for a short time.

    Edit, Just had a new thought, if you can get to the faucet from under the house, or by cutting out some sheet rock and yo find the adapter nailed or screwed to some framing, you might be able to remove the nails or screws, cut a 4" long piece of 2x4 and use it as a block to bump out the faucet 1.5" without even breaking any pipes. This will work if there is enough room.
    Last edited by keith3267; 04-09-2013 at 12:39 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,084

    Default Re: Outdoor Faucet

    This is what I'd do:
    - Shut the main.
    - Remove the hose bib.

    - If the hose bib was threaded, attach a brass coupling with a short brass nipple to where the hose bib was threaded.
    - Attach the hose bib to the new nipple.

    If the hose bib is sweated on the supply line, it's more complicated, and you'll need the help of a plumber. Don't use a torch, if you don't know how.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    69

    Default Re: Outdoor Faucet

    Danno,

    The siding company made a mistake!

    What they did there is improperly box in the faucet with too small a siding box---it's UP TO THEM to rectify the problem that they created at no charge to you; you're not required to spend any extra money to correct a mistake that should have been done right by the siding co. in the first place---this is just sloppy work, and my experience has been that these situations can be resolved quickly to the satisfaction of the homeowner.

    I specifically recommend you do NOTHING in the way of DIY work or hiring someone else to repair this until the siding co. comes over to COMPLETE THE SIDING JOB.

    If you haven't done so yet, call the siding co. owner or manager to advise them of the situation & tell them you want it fixed as soon as possible at no extra charge---also, the back side of the box has to be filled in with a small piece of new siding so the old siding is not showing.
    Last edited by von_steuben; 04-09-2013 at 01:49 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    821

    Default Re: Outdoor Faucet

    i 100% agree..

    Quote Originally Posted by von_steuben View Post
    Danno,

    The siding company made a mistake!

    What they did there is improperly box in the faucet with too small a siding box---it's UP TO THEM to rectify the problem that they created at no charge to you; you're not required to spend any extra money to correct a mistake that should have been done right by the siding co. in the first place---this is just sloppy work, and my experience has been that these situations can be resolved quickly to the satisfaction of the homeowner.

    I specifically recommend you do NOTHING in the way of DIY work or hiring someone else to repair this until the siding co. comes over to COMPLETE THE SIDING JOB.

    If you haven't done so yet, call the siding co. owner or manager to advise them of the situation & tell them you want it fixed as soon as possible at no extra charge---also, the back side of the box has to be filled in with a small piece of new siding so the old siding is not showing.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,084

    Default Re: Outdoor Faucet

    While it's true that the siding contractor should be held responsible, I doubt that the PO will be able to get him over to rectify the situation.

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