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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    4

    Default Split Rail Fence

    I'm replacing my split rail fence (1995 installed) with another one - made of the same material cedar - the rounded type as opposed to the rough cut. The original was not treated in any way. The original has been 'attacked' by carpenter bees and a number of posts have rotted at the base. My question - should or can I seal the new fence and posts before installing with a water seal product - would that protect it or is it a waste of time - is there something that I can use to protect it? Someone recomended I tar the posts before putting them in the ground. Any suggestions would be appreciated.


    Thanks,
    JOhn

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,480

    Default Re: Split Rail Fence

    Sealants may give you some additional protection, but generally speaking, a wood structure subject to the elements is hard to defend. Rain, wind, sun and temp fluctuations take a toll on the wood.
    Once you start with sealants, treat the cedar every year.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Split Rail Fence

    thanks - what about tarring the portion of the post below grade - any thoughts - or is it more messy than what it's worth -

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,480

    Default Re: Split Rail Fence

    Quote Originally Posted by ptwash13 View Post
    thanks - what about tarring the portion of the post below grade - any thoughts - or is it more messy than what it's worth -
    You can do that. I've done it before by dipping the bottom of the post into a half full bucket of black top and then spread the tar to cover the entire area to be encased in the concrete (usually 2').

    And yes, it's messy.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,769

    Default Re: Split Rail Fence

    Chemicals that are toxic to plants and insects are what protect wood from rotting or being eaten. Wood does not rot simply from being wet. Generally, the protecting chemicals are either a form of zinc or copper, both of which are toxic to plants. Rot is merely fungus eating away at the cellulose in the wood. Kill the fungus and the wood lasts a long time.

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