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Thread: sloping floor

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    2

    Default sloping floor

    I have a question regarding a sloping section of the 2nd story in my 1920 Dutch Colonial. There is an interior dividing wall between the bathroom and bedroom that has, I believe, pushed down on the floor joists creating a dramatic slope at the base of the wall. There is no interior wall directly underneath this on the first floor, and I believe it is the weight of this wall that has caused the floor to sag so dramatically. In the bedroom, there is a downhill slope in the floor towards this particular wall, and in the bathroom, it's the same situation although it appears much more dramatic as the bathroom has a width of only about 5 feet, and the floor appears to dive down about 4 or 5 inches in that small span of space.

    I have heard advice to leave it alone and try to put down self-leveling agent on the subfloor in the bathroom, but have also received advice that it would be best to jack it up. Is it advisable to jack up the second floor from the first floor, and what would be the best way to go about doing it? Directly under this wall on the first floor is the center of my dining room, so a permanent lally column wouldn't work.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,004

    Default Re: sloping floor

    sounds to me like someone took out a load bearing wall. that's exactly what will happen when a load bearing wall is removed and a beam is not installed, or the wrong sized beam.

    you need it to be inspected by a good contractor or a structural engineer asap.

    don't ignore this issue and try to level things out, find out why it's not level.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: sloping floor

    Do you mean downstairs, on the first floor? The floor layout is very traditional and if there ever was a load bearing wall there, it would have been running smack through the dining room in a very awkward way. I had someone view the house and he said it was the result of less than ideal design and 90 years of settling. I was told it was more of a cosmetic issue than anything, at this point, that it wouldn't settle beyond much what it already had. If i could have someone come in and jack it up and sister the joists or something, and if the cost was reasonable, I would consider it, I just need more information as to whether or not that is advisable or feasible cost-wise.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,741

    Default Re: sloping floor

    Until you have the place inspected, there is no point in speculating. The joists have to be inspected as well. There a lot of things which are not visible that can go wrong.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,004

    Default Re: sloping floor

    agreed, no speculating or hearsay....find out for sure why this happened. it's not that common unless something structural happened.

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