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Thread: Beaver board...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Boston area
    Posts
    99

    Default Beaver board...

    I recently bought a 1865 Second Empire in need of a ton of work. As an easy task I decided to remove some wallpaper and paint a few rooms as an oasis away from bigger project, but then I discovered many of my plaster walls aren't plaster. One room has one beaver board wall, another room has two, a mantle has some panels of it, it seems to pop up everywhere.

    What do I do with it? A plasterer told me he can't tape and blend it with the plaster walls because it will just move. Does this mean I need to remove it and replace it with drywall? I can't put this off for the future as we would like to get the house insulated soon, and I have a feeling it would be a bad idea to replace wallboard after having insulation blown in...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,969

    Default Re: Beaver board...

    It really should come down for a few reasons, mainly for the fire risk.

    The blown in insulation will remain together, slightly packed if left undisturbed. The key word is "undisturbed"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,736

    Default Re: Beaver board...

    There are risks in buying a home this old, and it looks like you opened a can of worms.

    Strip the walls down to the framing, do all your necessary electrical, plumbing, built in wiring, insulate (with regular insulation) now, then drywall.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,203

    Default Re: Beaver board...

    Of all the crap material you are prone to encounter in an old house, beaver board and celotex are two of the crappiest when used for wallboard. Stapled-on ceiling tile is another. You can't work around garbage like that for very long, you are far better off getting rid of it now, wiring and insulating.
    I always suggest using 5/8" rock in old houses because it is twice as substantial as 1/2" but doesn't cost twice as much; better bang for the buck, closer in solidity to the original plaster.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,808

    Default Re: Beaver board...

    No better project for "sweat equity" too. Ripping beaver board out is very easy, if messy. If it were a quality product, you wouldn't be considering removing it!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,663

    Default Re: Beaver board...

    Beaver board is good for bulletin boards. That's about it.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

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