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  1. #1
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    Default Metal Shed Concerns (and an idea)

    Greetings, all. I've been pondering on a metal shed as additional storage for a riding mower and things like that, but have almost talked myself into building a modified lean-to that I can still put a lock on. Building code is clean and green. I've tried to make this post easy to read and understand. Here's the deal..........

    I have a 16x20 stick shed that sits on skids, and the skids are on concrete blocks, so it sits a good ten inches off the ground. This shed is pretty well full of "stuff." I want more room for storage, but mostly want easier access to the riding mower and things like that, so I want a different shed for those things. I also want the entry lower to the ground so I don't need ramps. At one time I was going to build a ramp for the existing shed, but now it's getting full and I'm rethinking that. I currently use truck ramps, and store them out of the way when they're not in use. Directly beside the existing shed, inches away, is a 10x16 concrete pad, where a shed used to be. I want to use that pad as a foundation for a second shed, and a metal shed is fairly quick to put up and fits our budget. I don't much care to tie a new building into the existing shed because I'm worried about the existing shed settling. I'm also leery of the cost. Maybe the settling thing isn't a issue I need to worry about, but I still had two other issues I couldn't figure out.

    One: I'm 6' 2" and don't like the door height of the sheds I've looked at, but I feel like I'm pretty well stuck with what's offered because the sizes I'm looking at don't have many options. That lead me to thinking about sitting 4x4's on the concrete, where the outside walls will be, and sitting the shed on them, which would make the door higher and still leave a concrete floor and I still wouldn't need a ramp. I think that attaching 4x4's to the concrete and attaching the shed to the 4x4's would be plenty sturdy , but haven't figured out what to do about the gap it will leave at the bottom of the doors. I'm also concerned that if the doors aren't attached at the bottom it won't take much of a wind to make them fail. I could frame across the bottom of the doors, but that would defeat the purpose because it would leave the door opening at the same height. If there isn't a real solution, then it is what it is and I'll live with whatever door height I end up with.

    Two: I'm concerned about moisture problems. The side of the shed that's next to the concrete doesn't get much direct sunlight, so it gets power washed every couple of years to remove mold and mildew. We also paint when it needs it. I want the door of the new shed to open on the same side as the door on the existing shed, and that means the roof of a new shed will direct rain onto the side of the existing shed. Direct runoff, no sunlight, and a small gap between the two buildings won't be good.

    I've toyed with the idea of siding the existing shed, thinking moisture wouldn't matter as much on siding as compared to wood, but then finances rears it's ugly head. I don't know if that would be the best solution anyhow. I don't think gutters would really be the solution either. One option is to put most of the shed on the pad and leave a foot or two hang over the grass, then fill in that part inside the shed with gravel. That would give me the size wanted and also give access to the wood shed, but then again it was just a passing thought because I don't really like that idea either.

    I've also considered setting a 10x14 (or larger) shed somewhere else, but want to keep the open spaces I have, and really like the idea of using the existing concrete pad.

    As I was typing away and trying to explain my predicament clearly, I had a thought.... a lean-to... but not open to the front. If I turn it around and sit the opening against the existing shed there wouldn't be a moisture problem. The roof can sit at the wall of the existing shed, but below the roof overhang of the existing shed. Rain would come off the existing roof, onto the lean-to, and away from both sheds. I can maintain the wall of the existing shed. I can anchor the new shed to the concrete slab. I won't need to tie into the existing shed. I can have whatever size door I want. Hmmmmm. I'll have to sketch that out to see what it might look like, and then pencil out the cost. It might still be out of my reach.

    If nothing else I'll get a shed just big enough for the riding mower and set it on the opposite side of the concrete, away from the existing shed. At least the rider will be out of the way and I might be able to do something better and more permanent later, like three or four years down the road.

    After I post this I'm going back to looking for older threads about sheds. In the meantime, will anyone share any ideas or thoughts about the lean-to idea as well as my concerns about a metal shed?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Metal Shed Concerns (and an idea)

    Just a though about your first question: Do you think you can attach a door extension (maybe custom made), so that your door gives you a total seal?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Metal Shed Concerns (and an idea)

    IF it were me I'd simply extend the shed roof out over the existing pad and enclose either end. The open front can be secured with chainlink, or fully enclosed when the budget allows. You probably don't have a settling issue as long as the ground under the existing shed is stable, meaning it doesn't get saturated during the wet months, and you don't have heavy freeze/thaw cycles. Still, you could extend the shed roof a little bit, then tuck the addition up underneath the overhang. The shed can remain separate from the addition, yet still look like it's attached.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Metal Shed Concerns (and an idea)

    Quote Originally Posted by dj1 View Post
    Just a though about your first question: Do you think you can attach a door extension (maybe custom made), so that your door gives you a total seal?
    Thanks for the thought. Yes, I've thought about an extention, but it still leaves me with the rain runoff and moisture worries.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Metal Shed Concerns (and an idea)

    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spruce View Post
    IF it were me I'd simply extend the shed roof out over the existing pad and enclose either end. The open front can be secured with chainlink, or fully enclosed when the budget allows. You probably don't have a settling issue as long as the ground under the existing shed is stable, meaning it doesn't get saturated during the wet months, and you don't have heavy freeze/thaw cycles. Still, you could extend the shed roof a little bit, then tuck the addition up underneath the overhang. The shed can remain separate from the addition, yet still look like it's attached.
    I didn't think about chain link or something like that to get through for a spell. That's worth consideration.

    I've not yet sketched it out or figured lumber for the lean-to idea yet; I was wanting to simply get a shed and throw it up. Right now I'm in a "pay now or pay later" mindset and since I'm fortunate enough to have the rider and other stuff in a secure, dry place I'm in no big hurry and I have all spring to make a decision.

    Thanks for your replies.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Metal Shed Concerns (and an idea)

    Quote Originally Posted by Poison Oak View Post
    I didn't think about chain link or something like that to get through for a spell. That's worth consideration.

    I've not yet sketched it out or figured lumber for the lean-to idea yet; I was wanting to simply get a shed and throw it up. Right now I'm in a "pay now or pay later" mindset and since I'm fortunate enough to have the rider and other stuff in a secure, dry place I'm in no big hurry and I have all spring to make a decision.

    Thanks for your replies.
    I personally am not a fan of aluminum sheds, the door issue that you speak of is one reason, others are that they're not secure, they only minimally hide what is in them. They're also not cheap, they sweat, and they look like poo. The cost of building a lean-to is the cost of two walls and a roof, which I'd estimate at around $1000 in materials to do.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Metal Shed Concerns (and an idea)

    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spruce View Post
    I personally am not a fan of aluminum sheds, the door issue that you speak of is one reason, others are that they're not secure, they only minimally hide what is in them. They're also not cheap, they sweat, and they look like poo. The cost of building a lean-to is the cost of two walls and a roof, which I'd estimate at around $1000 in materials to do.
    Yeah, sweating is something to consider. A buddy has a small vinyl shed and doesn't like it or use it because it sweats a lot, so he doesn't bother to keep it looking good (dirt and mildew). I certainly don't want to create an eyesore that I don't like and won't use.

    The existing shed I'm working with is Gambrel style, so there isn't a lot of overhang, but the lean-to idea is still doable.

    All of your comments are appreciated because I'm still in the "thinking about what I want to do" stage, and once I make my mind made up there's usually no going back.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Metal Shed Concerns (and an idea)

    It would take a little work, but you could reslope one side of the gambrel roof to a height that is suitable, you wouldn't be able to keep the addition detached, but you could still get a good working height shed, which you'll want the ingress side of it to be at least 6'8" so you can enter without bending over, which means the existing shed side of the roof will have to be 8' high or more.

    You could also beef up the footings, at least the perimeter ones, on the existing shed to prevent the likelihood that it will move around.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Metal Shed Concerns (and an idea)

    I would consider a wood shed, remove the door frame and install a standard size door and you can close off the remaining open front and back at the bottom. Install a trough between the two roof to drain water away from the sides and to shelter the sides.

    Personally i would stick build a shed the size and height that you want.

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Metal Shed Concerns (and an idea)

    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spruce View Post
    It would take a little work, but you could reslope one side of the gambrel roof to a height that is suitable, you wouldn't be able to keep the addition detached, but you could still get a good working height shed, which you'll want the ingress side of it to be at least 6'8" so you can enter without bending over, which means the existing shed side of the roof will have to be 8' high or more.

    You could also beef up the footings, at least the perimeter ones, on the existing shed to prevent the likelihood that it will move around.
    I did consider tying it to the existing roof, but decided not to tie them together.

    I jacked the shed this past Summer and reset the blocks.

    The pad is 4" thick and sits 5" from the shed. From the ground to the fascia of the shed is 12", which would make it 8" from the pad. The front of the pad is even with the front of the shed.

    The edge of the roof is 8' 10" from the ground, so that will leave adequate head room even on the low side.

    And to be sure I'm clear, I'm putting the door on the 10' side. That will match the entry door of the existing shed and they'd both face the house.
    Last edited by Poison Oak; 01-28-2013 at 07:14 PM.

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