+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,081

    Default Re: Increase Hot Water Capacity

    Keith I understand your concept, but having hot water at 140 degrees is just unsafe.

    Look, I've built homes for the elderly, 6 to 20 units, and the law is so specific, that the State's representative comes in once a month with a thermometer to see how hot the water is. Can't be over 125, or there's a fine.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    South*East
    Posts
    1,168

    Default Re: Increase Hot Water Capacity

    Quote Originally Posted by dj1 View Post
    Keith I understand your concept, but having hot water at 140 degrees is just unsafe.

    Look, I've built homes for the elderly, 6 to 20 units, and the law is so specific, that the State's representative comes in once a month with a thermometer to see how hot the water is. Can't be over 125, or there's a fine.
    Not if you use a tempering valve at the water heater. In restaurants they require water temperatures above 125 but lower in the restrooms. They use a tempering on the line for the restrooms and feed the kitchen directly from the heater. Tempering valves are also used in homes that get there hot water from domestic coils in hot water boilers.

    John

  3. #13

    Default Re: Increase Hot Water Capacity

    C'mon guys, there are strict national codes prohibiting residential hot tap water from exceeding
    ~110 degrees for kids, the elderly, and adults in some places.

    At the HW temps suggested in the above posts, you'll parboil the kids, Child Welfare will pull them to go live with grandma in Omaha, & mom & dad will spend some time in the slammer.


    Google "inspectapedia scalding temperatures" for the national/state codes.
    Last edited by Molly Pitcher; 01-28-2013 at 10:17 PM.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,081

    Default Re: Increase Hot Water Capacity

    John,

    Good point about the tempering device. Thanks for mentioning it.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Increase Hot Water Capacity

    I apologize if someone already said this and I missed it,
    but should you decide on a tankless water heater do as much research as possible.

    Many big box stores are selling these, unfortunately they're not all created equal. Go beyond the specs and look at actual customer reviews. Visit specialty stores first (but don't buy immediately). You clearly value your comfort, and it's worth the extra time and money to get exactly the right system.

    That's if you go tankless.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,381

    Default Re: Increase Hot Water Capacity

    Quote Originally Posted by dj1 View Post
    Keith I understand your concept, but having hot water at 140 degrees is just unsafe.

    Look, I've built homes for the elderly, 6 to 20 units, and the law is so specific, that the State's representative comes in once a month with a thermometer to see how hot the water is. Can't be over 125, or there's a fine.
    I remember back in the first energy crisis that one of the recommendations for saving energy was to turn down your water heater to 140F. I guess I am very lucky to have survived my childhood, Our cars did not come equipped with seatbelts, I didn't have a helmet or knee and elbow pads when I rode my bike, all dogs were not leashed or fenced, I played outside with my friends without constant adult supervision, the lawnmower did not have a deadman handle and OMG, the water heater was well above 140F.

    I guess it was a good thing that I went to church on Sundays.

    BTW, when cars did finally come with seatbelts, we used them.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    South*East
    Posts
    1,168

    Talking Re: Increase Hot Water Capacity

    Quote Originally Posted by keith3267 View Post
    I remember back in the first energy crisis that one of the recommendations for saving energy was to turn down your water heater to 140F. I guess I am very lucky to have survived my childhood, Our cars did not come equipped with seatbelts, I didn't have a helmet or knee and elbow pads when I rode my bike, all dogs were not leashed or fenced, I played outside with my friends without constant adult supervision, the lawnmower did not have a deadman handle and OMG, the water heater was well above 140F.

    I guess it was a good thing that I went to church on Sundays.

    BTW, when cars did finally come with seatbelts, we used them.
    Just how did we ever survive with out all those laws to protect us from are self.

    John

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •