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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    1

    Default Sealing Pergo floors?

    I have pergo floors throughout my living room and dining room, and they're just awful. We clean it up right away if the dog has an accident, but in less than 2 yrs, pieces have begun to warp and peel away. I don't believe this damage would be covered in their warranty. Is it possible to seal the floors with something to prevent liquids from getting into the seams?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,242

    Default Re: Sealing Pergo floors?

    Welcome to the world of Pergo and Pergo-like products. Now you know why professionals do not recommend that type of flooring. The reason it is popular is because it is cheap. It is cheap for a reason, and a side effect of being cheap is what you're experiencing now, failure of the product.

    Trying to seal or refinish Pergo will be a waste of time and money, the only cure is to replace it with a better quality flooring.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,758

    Default Re: Sealing Pergo floors?

    Unfortunately, Spruce is correct.

    I use laminate for rental homes, and when this happens to me, I replace the floor. The main reason: cost. Second reason: I don't want to install an expensive wood floor just to have it destroyed by a vandal tenant.

    Dog pee can cause such damages. Train your dog.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,969

    Default Re: Sealing Pergo floors?

    The best coating in this instance is a rug.

    While peeling up the pergo, think about a nice tile.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Sealing Pergo floors?

    Old thread, I know. But it seems that everyone here is offering their personal opinion of Pergo floors and not answering the original poster's question.

    The answer is yes, you can seal click-lock style laminate floors like Pergo and Armstrong. The vast majority of the damage that gets Pergo its bad name is because installers, whether DIY or contractors, don't seal it right for wet areas. How to do it properly is usually right there in the instructions, and is covered in their instructional videos.

    I installed click-lock in my kitchen ten years ago where we keep our very, very drippy dogs' water bowls and spill and drip ourselves from time to time. We sealed the joints and the perimeter as instructed for wet areas and never had any issues with buckling, warping, or delamination. I'm installing Pergo Max in the bathroom of my new home today (1903 American Foursquare) to get me by for a couple of years until we can do a full remodel in there, and I'm on this thread just to see if there's any newer product recommended for sealing the joints than what I used ten years ago.

    All you have to do is run a small bead on the tongue and wipe the excess that seeps through the top. You just have to do it for every...single...joint. Eventually you get into a rhythm, and it really doesn't make your project prohibitively longer. Just make sure you measure twice, because, well, you know. Then you have to caulk/seal the perimeter.

    Bazillions of people are installing laminate floors every day. I guarantee you that the vast majority are not having problems with them. Logic would dictate that they would have gone out of production long ago if it was as bad as some of the posters here are making it out to be. Is it revered as highly as real tile or hardwoods? Of course not. On my last home it was a permanent solution. I was in a different vintage of home and a different financial stage in my life. And it has held up great. But here and now I would only use it as a temporary solution because, well, personal choice.

    Hope that helps, if you're still reading this thread.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,242

    Default Re: Sealing Pergo floors?

    Quote Originally Posted by iohokie View Post
    Bazillions of people are installing laminate floors every day. I guarantee you that the vast majority are not having problems with them. Logic would dictate that they would have gone out of production long ago if it was as bad as some of the posters here are making it out to be. Is it revered as highly as real tile or hardwoods? Of course not. On my last home it was a permanent solution. I was in a different vintage of home and a different financial stage in my life. And it has held up great. But here and now I would only use it as a temporary solution because, well, personal choice.
    Just because people buy something doesn't mean it's a good product, it only means that people are buying it, most commonly, because it is cheap, Pergo and Pergo-like products are no different, they is a bottom shelf product, no amount of sealer is going to change that.

    As for your opinion on opinions, that is your opinion, based on what, your experience the one time you've used it. Where do you think everyone else gets their opinions, exactly where you did, from experience. I can tell you that in 25 years of being a general contractor, my experience with Pergo is not a good one, not from the installers perspective, not from being satisfied with the end results, and not with long term customer satisfaction with the product.

    The professionals on this board do not just pull answers out of their posterior orifice, nor will we recommend products or techniques that produce less than a good quality finished product. In the end, it is the consumers checkbook that dictates the products being used.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,203

    Default Re: Sealing Pergo floors?

    Thin laminates are popular for one reason alone: Cost. And everyone knows that you don't get what you don't pay for so that low cost cuts away at something. Yes, there are ways to seal it better, but it is not and will never be a good choice for those more wet locations. The product in becoming more seen as a cheap alternative, like popcorn ceilings and vinyl siding, than for any real merits it has. In owner-occupied homes where it's well looked after, it can be a good choice in places, but in rentals it can be ruined by the first tenant and in that case it's low cost and easy replacement makes it a viable option. I'm a traditionalist with many things for a reason and floors are one of those things.

    Phil

  8. #8

    Default Re: Sealing Pergo floors?

    Your warranty cover this or not depend upon the seller. Everyone has different policies for this. You should concentrate to laminate your floor to prevent the liquids getting into the seams.

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