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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default Structural engineering - removing a wall

    I want to remove a wall in old house that runs perpendicular to the ceiling joists. Single story house that was built in 1945. Pier and beam foundation.

    The wall I want to remove is 15' wide x 10' tall and is currently full 2x4 (really 2x4) on 24" centers and each side of the wall is sheeted with 1x10s with virtually no gap between them. The wall is then covered with 1/2" drywall. It is built like a tank.

    To remove this wall, how big of a beam do I have to have or can I 'sister' with bolts a 2x10 or 2x12 to each side of the existing wall (at the top of course) to act as a beam.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    820

    Default Re: Structural engineering - removing a wall

    if the wall runs perpendicular to the ceiling joists doesn't necessarly mean it's load bearing but it sounds like it probably is. in order to size a beam you need a good contractor or an engineer to come take a look at it. main reason being is that you also need somewhere for the beam's load to be carried down to something in the basement. a lot of weight will be carried on the posts for the beam and just putting posts on subflooring can eventually break through the subfloor.

    whenever something structural is needed it has to be looked at by someone who knows what they're doing. as for installing a beam, not only is the size of the beam important but the type of beam is important. a 2x6 KD pine has a different stress load from a 2x6 glue lam which has a different stress load from 2x6 fir, etc, etc, etc.

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