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Thread: Hot Water Tank

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    12

    Default Hot Water Tank

    I need some help figuring out what type of water tank we should get installed.

    We have a tankless boiler (Beckett) which runs off oil. It was installed in Fall 2009. We did not have any issue with the old boiler but since last winter evryone has been complining about not having enough hot water for shower. The water keeps turning cold to hot to cold every few minutes.

    We talked to our oil supplier who also installed the boiler and he suggested to have a tank installed. He gave us two quotes,one for about $1500 and one for $2400. He said the more expensive one is made up stainless still and would last longer.

    We do not know anything about the water tanks. Below is what we would like to know.

    1) Are there any other options?
    2) Would it be better to get electric heater added?
    3) What kind of things we should consider besides financial burden?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,076

    Default Re: Hot Water Tank

    Can you tell us what's included in his $1500 and $2400 bids?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: Hot Water Tank

    I usually write down details but I can't seem to find it. I know both prices include parts and labor.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    South*East
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    1,168

    Default Re: Hot Water Tank

    What he's talking about is an indirect water heater that connects to the boiler on a separate zone. In my opinion that is the best way to make domestic hot water.

    John

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    137

    Default Re: Hot Water Tank

    I agree with John.

    Anyone who has had an indirect hwh installed knows the value of not having to run out of hw; typical size is 40 gallons, but the sizing chart below will be a better guide---these units last for years without any service (especially if you have soft water); basically, the hot boiler water is piped thru the center of the indirect hwh and the heat from the hot boiler water is transferred (heat exchanger) to the domestic hot water (DHW) that supplies the showers, faucets, dishwasher, clothes washer, etc.---the upfront cost of the indirects is initially high, but it's a one-shot expense that should last you at least a decade, and you won't be burning any additional oil to heat up an oil-fired HWH, or any elec. to heat up an electric HWH.

    Indirect 40 gallon hot water heaters made by Triangle Tube Phase 3 (stainless steel innards), HTP Superstor, Weil-MvcLain G0ld Plus, Lochinvar Squire, or TFI Everhot and others, have a stainless steel tank inside a stainless steel tank to prevent corrosion, especially if you have hard water (lots of minerals)---the stainless steel versions also are more efficient in making hot water because there is more surface area involved in the heat exchanging process---the stainless steel versions generally run $500 to $800 more than the "copper coil inside the tank" models (Amtrol Boiler Mate & others)---if you have soft water in your area (low in calcium & minerals) you may be able to get away with using the lower priced 40 gallon Amtrol, but since you will be running hw water thru from a steam boiler, which is not as clean as a hot water boiler, you probably will be better off with a stainless steel model.

    Since you have a steam heat boiler, the installation is a little more involved to include an in-line strainer in the pipe supply from the boiler to the indirect hwh, and a quad check valve from the indirect return to the boiler; drain valves also have to be installed in both supply & return lines to prevent boiler water crud from clogging up the piping.

    If you don't have a service contract now with your current boiler service co., by all means get at least 2 more estimates for this job; the stainless steel indirects go for approx $1200 plus installation, and the Amtrol non-stainless steel go for approx $800 plus installation.

    Calculate your PEAK HOURLY HOT WATER DEMAND, following the 2nd site below---this is the time of day (usually the morning rush hour) when everyone in the household is trying to shower, wash, shave, etc., roughly at the same time, so you need something like a 30 gal or 40 gal indirect to not only have enough HW ready, but to have a QUICK RECOVERY RATE during that one or two hours when DHW demand is at its highest.



    http://www.aceee.org/consumer/water-heating
    http://www.ag.uiuc.edu/~disaster/replace/waterhtr.html
    http://www.pexsupply.com/Indirect-Water-Heaters-1731000
    Last edited by Pelton; 03-12-2013 at 12:05 AM.

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