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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Heating a Woodshop

    Maintain a constant temp. above freezing (50 degrees) 24/7 when not working. In the shop in the evenings and weekends religiously. 60 degrees when in the shop for 4 hrs. each weekday in evenings and 8-12 hrs on Sat./Sun. Live in NJ so temps fall in October till April. This is my heat requirements......

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    612

    Default Re: Heating a Woodshop

    http://nepacrossroads.com/fuel-compa...calculator.php

    here is a link to a fuel cost comparison calculator.

    http://tools.warmlyyours.com/hlc/room/room_general

    and here is a link to a heat loss calculator.

    i use a coal stoker stove in my workshop. i also have a coal stoker in the house so the same size coal is used in both units and since i get it in bulk it is on hand. the stokers are thermostat controlled do i set the thermometer to what i want and then just fill the hoppers and empty the ash pan. it is by far the cheapest way for me to heat.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Heating a Woodshop

    How large is your workshop. I had thought about coal or pellet heat but seems that a 20x20 (400sq ft insulated space) is too small for all the stoves I've seen that are automatically fed based on thermostat. To maintain a 50 degree temp when not in the shop would barely be burning and would likely burn out at times. Is this correct?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    central pa
    Posts
    98

    Default Re: Heating a Woodshop

    with coal yes they dont have auto igniters but i think it would be fine but many pellet stoves have auto igniters so they can go out completly and then start back up on their own. but coal would probably be fine also they put out very little heat in low fire mode just a very small smouldering fire. here in central pa coal is cheaper for sure i heat my house with coal but when i built the shop pellets were much cheaper so i went with pellet stove and i have been very happy with it. i burn about 1.5 to 2 tons a year. but i also work out of the shop fulltime three or four days a week. and if i am spraying the stove runs full bore all day to try to keep heat in the shop with exhaust fan running
    Last edited by junkout; 12-16-2012 at 05:47 PM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    612

    Default Re: Heating a Woodshop

    the coal stoker won't go out, it runs in what i'll call "idle mode". there is a control box that the thermostat is wired to which has timers in it. if the thermostat does not call for heat, the stove runs by the timers to keep the fire lit for when the thermostat does call for heat.

    the stove has a combustion fan on it that feeds air to the coal for the fire. i have the timers set to run this fan and the coal feeder for 3 minutes and then shut off for 12 minutes. this keeps the fire lit, uses minimal coal and the 20 x 20 insulated workshop stays warm even in the coldest temps. keeps things dry in there too so the tools don't get any surface rust on them.

    there are different btu sized coal stokers out there, most can be throttled back to put out about 5k btu up to their max (mine is 90k btu max). admittedly too big for the shop, but it is identical to the house stoker so i have spare parts for the house stoker in an emergency if needed. both burn rice coal so i don't have to store different types of fuel. unlike pellets, the coal doesn't care if it gets wet so outside storage is ok and it doesn't take up indoor floor space. although it can be damp when i put it in the hopper if it is sopping wet, it will cause feed issues.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Heating a Woodshop

    Seems like everyone is steering clear of electric radiant heat. Why? Running cost issue? Ran across ceiling mounted electric radiant heat panels (measure 2x4ft) on another blog. Anyone know anything about these?

    bp21901 - is your shop 20x20? Do you have enough experience with the stove your using to recommend a brand or size?

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    612

    Default Re: Heating a Woodshop

    i stayed away from electric heat because of operating cost and panel capacity.

    my shop is 20 x 20 and insulated floor, walls and ceiling built onto the back of the detached garage. i do have a 6' opening to the garage that is only closed off with a piece of plastic so it is not air tight there by any means. shop gets too hot, i open the plastic to garage, if i want to work on the car in the garage, i'll open the plastic up to warm it up.

    if i was to recommend a stoker it would be a Leisure Line, pick a size from their models to fit your btu needs. solid product & great customer service, owners put their cell number in the user manual, can't get any more accessible than that.

    total cost of install is not only the stove, but the chimney as well, keep that in mind.

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