+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,481

    Default Re: Interesting Problem

    Quote Originally Posted by HoustonRemodeler View Post
    Do the dirt grains taste salty or rusty? Tell Mrs Spruce this is a critical test and we need her discriminating pallet.
    A sample is in the mail to you as we speak!
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,089

    Default Re: Interesting Problem

    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spruce View Post
    A sample is in the mail to you as we speak!
    Haha, accompanied with a check to cover the cost of the testing of course.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,481

    Default Re: Interesting Problem

    Update:

    With the warmer weather there is more critter activity, and guess what, it is termites, DAMN IT!!!!!!! Not sure what I'm going to do about them at the moment, trying to come up with non-chemical methods to eradicate them. I have never seen them burrow through drywall before, eat the paper off the back, yes, but never burrow through.

    I have not been under the house or deck yet to see if there are tubes to knock down, that will be a project for later this week. Wouldn't you know it, it's the corner of the house furthest away from the access hole too. How do critters always know where the access hole is to be able to find the most remote spot possible?

    Did I say DAMN IT!!!!! yet?
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,089

    Default Re: Interesting Problem

    Spruce,

    This is bad news. Try orange oil termite treatment without toxic chemicals.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,363

    Default Re: Interesting Problem

    Termites hate dry sand. Pour a bag or two of course dry sand around each pier. When they go to make tubes, the tubes collapse and the termite union rep files a grievance. They go on strike and picket until the sand is removed.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,481

    Default Re: Interesting Problem

    Quote Originally Posted by HoustonRemodeler View Post
    Termites hate dry sand. Pour a bag or two of course dry sand around each pier. When they go to make tubes, the tubes collapse and the termite union rep files a grievance. They go on strike and picket until the sand is removed.
    Now THAT is a union I can live with!

    Quote Originally Posted by dj1 View Post
    Spruce,

    This is bad news. Try orange oil termite treatment without toxic chemicals.
    Thanks for the suggestion, I will look into it. Preliminary investigation into turdmites suggests two species, subterranean and dry wood dwelling, the latter seems to be what they are, by the looks of them. If I understand this correctly, then the dry wood dwelling aren't going to have tubes on the foundation and such. I really rather the buggers had been ants, I've got a surefire method for dealing with those! <evil grin>
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    598

    Default Re: Interesting Problem

    Termites love to eat wood. Drywall used in ceilings contains paper and cellulose,papers made of wood. The brown spots that look like rust are probably from the mud tunnels the termites create. The tunnels may be breaking down from moisture then soaks into the sheetrock,

    Looks like you have your hands full Spruceeeee...Good Luck
    Gizmo

    Cut it 3 times & it's still to short.
    Inventor of the Miter Master Plus.

    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,363

    Default Re: Interesting Problem

    Round these parts dry termites are treated by tenting the house for a day, just like my next door neighbor. And my house. And the one on the other side......

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,481

    Default Re: Interesting Problem

    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmo View Post
    The tunnels may be breaking down from moisture then soaks into the sheetrock,

    Looks like you have your hands full Spruceeeee...Good Luck
    No, each of the holes have wiggling little butts hanging out of them, the "sand" like debris would be turdmite turds. I'm thinking a little caulking in all the holes, then move in the middle of the night. Nobody will be the wiser . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by HoustonRemodeler View Post
    Round these parts dry termites are treated by tenting the house for a day, just like my next door neighbor. And my house. And the one on the other side......
    I want to avoid chemical means if possible.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,381

    Default Re: Interesting Problem

    If they are subterranean termites diatomaceous earth around the base of each pier will discourage them. Its like broken glass to us. You can use it as a layer under the sand, but you want a layer.

    You can poke out the little holes and spray a boric acid roach dust into the holes, that drives them out also. There is a liquid foaming sodium borate solution that can be injected into your wall cavities to treat the wood against termites, but it takes a professional exterminator to do this, and it can't be done with some types of insulation. It can also be hard to find an exterminator who does this type of work, but as chemicals go, the sodium borates are pretty safe around humans.

    BTW, I have an uncle who had this same problem with termites and he used the roach powder sprayed into the holes. He doesn't have termites now but I don't know if he ended up tenting the house or not. I think he did.

    Also for subterranean termites, if you can jack the house off the piers even a fraction of an inch, then you can slip a copper plate between the top of the pier and the house frame. It needs to be at least two inches larger than the pier all around. That makes a termite barrier.

    BTW, subterranean termites don't eat wood. They chew up wood, take it into the ground and make a paste of it, then plant a fungi in it and eat the fungi.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •