+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 32
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    South*East
    Posts
    1,168

    Default Re: Need new water heater option

    That would be the maximum it could burn. More often then not your burner service tech would cut the burn rate. Look to see if there is a service record on the boiler. That may tell you what size nozzle is being used.

    John

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Abington, MA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Need new water heater option

    Quote Originally Posted by johnjh2o View Post
    That would be the maximum it could burn. More often then not your burner service tech would cut the burn rate. Look to see if there is a service record on the boiler. That may tell you what size nozzle is being used.

    John
    Its a Riello BF5 burner with a .90 80degree B

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Abington, MA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Need new water heater option

    If I'm burning that amount of oil then it may be cheaper to go to electric. Correct? Anyone???

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,381

    Default Re: Need new water heater option

    I think you are right about it being 1.1 gph but I only had information from the Peerless website. It also appears that the nozzle has been downsized to .90 gph, which is a common practice. I didn't go through their whole website just the home page and a couple others and they may have just been featuring the two boilers, one with the .5 gph and the one with the .84 gph, it probably wasn't their whole product line.

    I can't answer your question about whether electric being cheaper. It depends on how much hot water and at what temperature rise your current system produces per hour. If your present boiler produces all you domestic hot water with only 10 or 15 minutes of run time per day, then it may be more economical.

    The second web page I posted the link to claims that oil fired boilers are economical, but that might not be the case for very low levels of consumption. Unlike a direct heat boiler, an indirect heat boiler has cycling losses. That is it has to heat up the circulating medium before it starts to heat the hot water, some of that is lost at the beginning and end of the cycle.

    From the specs you gave, I could not figure out the recovery rate. The contractors that you got estimates from should be able to provide you with that information.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Abington, MA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Need new water heater option

    Quote Originally Posted by keith3267 View Post
    I think you are right about it being 1.1 gph but I only had information from the Peerless website. It also appears that the nozzle has been downsized to .90 gph, which is a common practice. I didn't go through their whole website just the home page and a couple others and they may have just been featuring the two boilers, one with the .5 gph and the one with the .84 gph, it probably wasn't their whole product line.

    I can't answer your question about whether electric being cheaper. It depends on how much hot water and at what temperature rise your current system produces per hour. If your present boiler produces all you domestic hot water with only 10 or 15 minutes of run time per day, then it may be more economical.

    The second web page I posted the link to claims that oil fired boilers are economical, but that might not be the case for very low levels of consumption. Unlike a direct heat boiler, an indirect heat boiler has cycling losses. That is it has to heat up the circulating medium before it starts to heat the hot water, some of that is lost at the beginning and end of the cycle.

    From the specs you gave, I could not figure out the recovery rate. The contractors that you got estimates from should be able to provide you with that information.
    Thank you for the feedback Keith. However that has been my issue. All of the contractors that I have spoken to have not been able to give me a direct answer to which system will be more cost effective. They came out and looked at the system and said I can go either way electrical or another indirect. They say indirect recovers faster which I know that but they could not say if the electrical would be cheaper to run. Only one contractor has stated that the new hybrid electric heater GEO Spring with heat pump my be a better option. He also states that I may qualify for the rebate up to $1000. However I have read that the heat pump models are not good for the Northeast and that the Boiler is better off with indirects as it keeps them lubricated during the summer when the seals can get damaged by moisture or just sitting. I guess either way I'm paying.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Abington, MA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Need new water heater option

    Quote Originally Posted by keith3267 View Post
    I think you are right about it being 1.1 gph but I only had information from the Peerless website. It also appears that the nozzle has been downsized to .90 gph, which is a common practice. I didn't go through their whole website just the home page and a couple others and they may have just been featuring the two boilers, one with the .5 gph and the one with the .84 gph, it probably wasn't their whole product line.

    I can't answer your question about whether electric being cheaper. It depends on how much hot water and at what temperature rise your current system produces per hour. If your present boiler produces all you domestic hot water with only 10 or 15 minutes of run time per day, then it may be more economical.

    The second web page I posted the link to claims that oil fired boilers are economical, but that might not be the case for very low levels of consumption. Unlike a direct heat boiler, an indirect heat boiler has cycling losses. That is it has to heat up the circulating medium before it starts to heat the hot water, some of that is lost at the beginning and end of the cycle.

    From the specs you gave, I could not figure out the recovery rate. The contractors that you got estimates from should be able to provide you with that information.
    Thank you for the feedback Keith. However that has been my issue. All of the contractors that I have spoken to have not been able to give me a direct answer to which system will be more cost effective. They came out and looked at the system and said I can go either way electrical or another indirect. They say indirect recovers faster which I know that but they could not say if the electrical would be cheaper to run. Only one contractor has stated that the new hybrid electric heater GEO Spring with heat pump my be a better option. He also states that I may qualify for the rebate up to $1000. However I have read that the heat pump models are not good for the Northeast and that the Boiler is better off with indirects as it keeps them lubricated during the summer when the seals can get damaged by moisture or just sitting. I guess either way I'm paying.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,381

    Default Re: Need new water heater option

    I would not recommend the heat pump, it is way expensive and it doesn't generate heat, it only moves it. If your water heater is in an unheated space, then the heat pump will not be very efficient in the winter and if it is in a heated space, it will suck the heat out of the conditioned space which will have to be made up for by the house heater, in other words, you pay for this heat twice in the winter, but its nice in the summer.

    I'm sorry I cannot help you any further with out knowing the recovery rate of your current system. The contractors may have trouble with this as well as it appears that it is a component system with data on the separate components, but not combined for the whole system.

    This is just a gut feeling, but if you have the electrical service at the water heater so that a new electric water heater is a "plug and play", it will have the lowest TOC (total owner cost). If you need a new electrical service to go electric, the oil might be the less expensive.

    I think part of your current problem is that the contractor who originally installed your system probably used the absolute cheapest storage tank he could find in order to increase his profit or in a misguided attempt to save the customer as much money as possible.

    If you replace the tank, look for a tank with a long life. Things like "glass lined" "stainless steel" "epoxy coated" etc come to mind. See if they come with an Anode Rod, and if they do, be sure to change it every two years or so. The tank should have good insulation as well. Look for only the top of the line tanks and then take the one of those with the best price point. Don't go with a cheap tank that you just have to replace again in 6 years.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Abington, MA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Need new water heater option

    Quote Originally Posted by keith3267 View Post
    I would not recommend the heat pump, it is way expensive and it doesn't generate heat, it only moves it. If your water heater is in an unheated space, then the heat pump will not be very efficient in the winter and if it is in a heated space, it will suck the heat out of the conditioned space which will have to be made up for by the house heater, in other words, you pay for this heat twice in the winter, but its nice in the summer.

    I'm sorry I cannot help you any further with out knowing the recovery rate of your current system. The contractors may have trouble with this as well as it appears that it is a component system with data on the separate components, but not combined for the whole system.

    This is just a gut feeling, but if you have the electrical service at the water heater so that a new electric water heater is a "plug and play", it will have the lowest TOC (total owner cost). If you need a new electrical service to go electric, the oil might be the less expensive.

    I think part of your current problem is that the contractor who originally installed your system probably used the absolute cheapest storage tank he could find in order to increase his profit or in a misguided attempt to save the customer as much money as possible.

    If you replace the tank, look for a tank with a long life. Things like "glass lined" "stainless steel" "epoxy coated" etc come to mind. See if they come with an Anode Rod, and if they do, be sure to change it every two years or so. The tank should have good insulation as well. Look for only the top of the line tanks and then take the one of those with the best price point. Don't go with a cheap tank that you just have to replace again in 6 years.
    Thank you once again for your time Keith. If I go with a basic 50 gallon electric for the time being (Holiday season and money is tight to invest $2000 in the installation of indirect). Can I just cap off the supply and return to and from the Boiler and just hook up the cold water supply and hot outlet on the electric heater? Seems like something simple I can do my self. Then if I feel that it's not working out I can simply go back to indirect. Or is it more complicated than that and really need a professional?

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,381

    Default Re: Need new water heater option

    Do you have the electrical wiring needed?

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Abington, MA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Need new water heater option

    Need to run wire and breaker. The panel is about 15ft from tank.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •