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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    3

    Default load bearing wall removal w pics

    Hi all. I am considering removing a wall in between our kitchen and dining room. Currently there is a door way in this wall. House was built in the mid 1950's. I removed some plaster and lathe to see if it was really load bearing. Attached is a pic. The wall runs parallel to the ceiling joist above it however the 2x4's are notched and one joist rests on the notch. I'm not sure if this would be considered balloon construction as there does not appear to be a top plate. There is no wall above this kitchen wall. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I would like to remove wall to open up area into a bigger eat in kitchen. Thank You!
    Last edited by sn22; 11-27-2012 at 06:51 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,598

    Default Re: load bearing wall removal w pics

    Your photo can't be seen. And even it could be seen, it would be nearly impossible to determine without visual physical examination, from our computer screen.

    Before you do anything you need to be 110% certain about this wall. Not only if it's a load bearing wall.

    Do you have your home's approved plans? Can you go to the city and have them look it up for you?

    If no, call a couple of general contractors to view the wall, assess it and give you their opinions.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: load bearing wall removal w pics

    Thank You for the response. I do not think that this is a load bearing wall because it runs parallel with the ceiling joist so it would only carry the load of one joist. The balloon construction though has me confused. I'm going to go up into attic tonight and see where these long wall studs go to in the attic and if they are holding anything up or what the deal is.
    I did not call the city to see if I could find the plans yet. I will do this though as well as having a contractor familar with balloon construction look at it.
    The fact that the studs are notched is whats confusing to me. I can email the photo if you wanted to see it.
    Thank You,
    Scott

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    86

    Default Re: load bearing wall removal w pics

    Quote Originally Posted by sn22 View Post
    Hi all. I am considering removing a wall in between our kitchen and dining room. Currently there is a door way in this wall. House was built in the mid 1950's. I removed some plaster and lathe to see if it was really load bearing. Attached is a pic. The wall runs parallel to the ceiling joist above it however the 2x4's are notched and one joist rests on the notch. I'm not sure if this would be considered balloon construction as there does not appear to be a top plate. There is no wall above this kitchen wall. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I would like to remove wall to open up area into a bigger eat in kitchen. Thank You!
    Unfortunately I can't view the picture.
    Normally I don't believe internet forums are appropriate when it comes to advising novices when it comes to load bearing structural components. When it comes down to the structure it really should be an onsite evaluation done by a professional since no one over the internet can see as to what's what and where.

    Having said that; based on your description it sounds as though the wall in question is likely a simple interior dividing wall.
    By chance is there a wall that intersects this one at 90 degrees that seperates the kitchen from another room, perhaps the living room ?
    Does that wall run perpendicular to the above joists down the approximate center of the home?
    Does that dining room also have a wall with a door opening the extends this center wall or perhaps a dropped down portion from the ceiling?

    Your description of the notched studs would be fastened to the joist along the vertical part of the notch. I too have seen this in older homes instead of the more common method of a top plate secured to blocking fastened between joists used today. In some cases someone that was familiar with old framing techniques ( some coming from the old ballon framing days ) , saving material ( the top plate ), regional methods or all of those.
    Consider in those days many carpenters used hand saws , that's a lot of labour.

    Bottom line, it seems the wall in question is non load bearing and you should be able to proceed as planned. However, this is sight unseen and if in doubt call in a professional to evaluate things onsite.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: load bearing wall removal w pics

    Thanks for the info and response. I answered a couple of your questions below.
    Quote Originally Posted by LeonardHomes View Post
    Unfortunately I can't view the picture.
    Normally I don't believe internet forums are appropriate when it comes to advising novices when it comes to load bearing structural components. When it comes down to the structure it really should be an onsite evaluation done by a professional since no one over the internet can see as to what's what and where.

    Having said that; based on your description it sounds as though the wall in question is likely a simple interior dividing wall.
    By chance is there a wall that intersects this one at 90 degrees that seperates the kitchen from another room, perhaps the living room ? Yes, there are two walls that intersect this wall at a 90 degree angle.
    Does that wall run perpendicular to the above joists down the approximate center of the home? Yes, one of the walls does.
    Does that dining room also have a wall with a door opening the extends this center wall or perhaps a dropped down portion from the ceiling? Theres a door way in this wall that I want to remove. The door way is in the center of the subject wall. There is no header above the doorway, just the studs that run upstairs.

    Your description of the notched studs would be fastened to the joist along the vertical part of the notch. I too have seen this in older homes instead of the more common method of a top plate secured to blocking fastened between joists used today. In some cases someone that was familiar with old framing techniques ( some coming from the old ballon framing days ) , saving material ( the top plate ), regional methods or all of those.
    Consider in those days many carpenters used hand saws , that's a lot of labour.

    Bottom line, it seems the wall in question is non load bearing and you should be able to proceed as planned. However, this is sight unseen and if in doubt call in a professional to evaluate things onsite.
    I am having a contractor come over next week to evaluate. Thanks for the help.

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