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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
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    3

    Default New white pine floor

    I am laying a new white pine floor and want to finish it with a product that will seal the wood, last for years, not scratch from dogs and sand that will inevitably come along with shoes. I have a bad reaction to polyurenthane.
    What else can we use that won't be so smelly and toxic. It's winter, 8 degrees and we will have to live next to the addition until the door is cut to open up the two rooms.

    I am hoping to find some eco/nontoxic/enduring product that doesn't cost $170.00 a liter. We want a clear satin product so we can enjoy the lovely pine that use to grace out land.

    thanks
    scaredy cat

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,914

    Default Re: New white pine floor

    I've got just the thing for you, it's hypoallergenic, easy to maintain, durable . . . It's called tile.

    You will not find a finish of any kind that can withstand the abuse you are asking about, especially over a soft wood such as pine.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,987

    Default Re: New white pine floor

    Tile would be a good choice given your reaction to poly.
    I wonder if a water based product would affect you less. Given the time of year and not being able to open windows, nothing may work for you. A prefinished product would be the way to go.
    Dog don't usually care a lot for either.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    226

    Default Re: New white pine floor

    I used a low odor water-based polyurethane (not polyacrylic) on my refinished stairs. Most of it went on in November, and it did not bother my family or me. You could test some on an extra piece of wood and see if you can tolerate it. There is a water-based polyurethane made by Varathane just for floors. I used a Rustoleum product but they are the same company. Others may be able to recommend other products and brands.

    If you really want wood you will have to accept that it will show wear over time. I personally do not distress wood or furniture on purpose, but a little wear in the home is not a bad thing shows that real people live there. Solid wood can be refinished if needed. Shoes should be kicked off at the door, furniture should have pads on the legs. Area rugs will help with high traffic areas. Pine is a soft wood and prone to dents. When the wear starts to show, just keep in mind that people pay high prices to put reclaimed distressed pine in their homes.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,369

    Default Re: New white pine floor

    White pine is mighty soft for flooring. Putting a very hard varnish on top of soft wood creates all kinds of chipping problems too. The wood is going to dent irrespective of the finish used. Since chemical sensitivity is an important consideration, and since it's white pine, I would use shellac. It's non-toxic when dry, dries in the shortest time of any finish (4 coats can go down in a day) and is zero VOC. It's also a renewable resource, and a naturally-sourced resin. People will chime in with the usual refrain "boo, it's not suitable for floors, shellac's too delicate" well, white pine is too soft as well, so they are in that way quite compatible. Shellac can be quickly touched up whenever needed (and you are going to need it, with soft pine and pups!)
    Good luck.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    3

    Lightbulb Re: New white pine floor

    Quote Originally Posted by Lily View Post
    I used a low odor water-based polyurethane (not polyacrylic) on my refinished stairs. Most of it went on in November, and it did not bother my family or me. You could test some on an extra piece of wood and see if you can tolerate it. There is a water-based polyurethane made by Varathane just for floors. I used a Rustoleum product – but they are the same company. Others may be able to recommend other products and brands.

    If you really want wood you will have to accept that it will show wear over time. I personally do not distress wood or furniture on purpose, but a little wear in the home is not a bad thing – shows that real people live there. Solid wood can be refinished if needed. Shoes should be kicked off at the door, furniture should have pads on the legs. Area rugs will help with high traffic areas. Pine is a soft wood and prone to dents. When the wear starts to show, just keep in mind that people pay high prices to put reclaimed distressed pine in their homes.
    Thank you for your prompt reply, don't get that even at the Town Hall!
    We milled the pine ourselves and it was a true 1"..planed to 7/8". I am totally OK with the wear it will take from being Pine. I am romantically involved with OUR pine and it's just the idea of our trees staying on the property.
    As for wear...I know it's going to dent etc. As you said, looks like someone lives here. I am just concerned with the smell. 30 years ago, the outside was conditioned with pine tar! Talk about smell.

    I was hoping to find a sealing product, new to the market(we've seen a whey product)that is compatible with humans and animals.

    thanks so much.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: New white pine floor

    Quote Originally Posted by Sombreuil_mongrel View Post
    White pine is mighty soft for flooring. Putting a very hard varnish on top of soft wood creates all kinds of chipping problems too. The wood is going to dent irrespective of the finish used. Since chemical sensitivity is an important consideration, and since it's white pine, I would use shellac. It's non-toxic when dry, dries in the shortest time of any finish (4 coats can go down in a day) and is zero VOC. It's also a renewable resource, and a naturally-sourced resin. People will chime in with the usual refrain "boo, it's not suitable for floors, shellac's too delicate" well, white pine is too soft as well, so they are in that way quite compatible. Shellac can be quickly touched up whenever needed (and you are going to need it, with soft pine and pups!)
    Good luck.
    Casey
    Casey,
    Thanks for your suggestion. I think Shellac is a great product. My boat building friend uses it and as you say, is a naturally-sourced resin. The pine is a romantic connection to our land and we are totally OK with the "lived in" look. How do you apply the shellac...roller? brush?
    I will be using a very large old oriental rug that should cover the high traffic areas. My major concern is the smell.
    Here in NH, we are dipping down into the single numbers in the next couple of days and wondering if we can actually pull this off. Maybe we should wait until the temps go up? I worry about the guys doing the job, maybe should wear respirators? I did happen upon a whey product out of VT. but it didn't get very good reviews.
    The Boys(dogs)will have to wear slippers.
    Thanks

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,369

    Default Re: New white pine floor

    Hi,
    There will only be the alcohol odor, for maybe an hour after each coat. I use a big 'ol 4" wide staining brush. Very possible to use a roller for the first 2 coats as the shellac will not build a finish until coat 4. I do recommend using a brush for that.
    You may want a bit of color; my own shellac floor, I used a first coat of garnet shellac to give a nice traditional amber color, then finished off with clear Sealcoat shellac, which is premixed/canned (the garnet is mixed in alcohol from dry flakes). You can buy dyes to tint clear shellac to a very close simulation of garnet with some brown mahogany dye and a drop or two of blood red dye.
    The Sealcoat is a wax-free type. Wax-containing shellac has a very different feel, and it does build a film much faster, because the wax is a filler. You can use a buffer on the wax-containing shellac finishes and get a very smooth dancefloor-like feel. I would not use it on stairs as it is quite slippery. Premixed wax-containing shellac has a shorter shelf-life. Any premixed shellac has a shorter effective shelf life as the clock starts when dissolved in alcohol; I use flakes and mix up enough for each job so it's as fresh as possible. If the second coat stays soft and gummy, the shellac is out of date. You can test this on a scrap whenever in doubt.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,917

    Default Re: New white pine floor

    Checkout the water soluble urethanes from the Bona company, WWW.Bona.Com. Bona is a 100 year old swedish company which specializes in wood floor finishes. WB urethanes are fast drying, low odor and impart no amber tone, as do oil based uretanes. They also do not yellow with age. My original finish was a highly toxic oil urethane from Sweden called Glitza. Now that I occupy the house, Bona gave a good alternative for a re-coating product.

    If you don't use a stain, any scratching or denting will not expose virgin wood and show badly. If you want to keep that bright white pine look, give it a coat of wiped white pickling stained. Be aware that if you do not apply a stain, the white pine will turn a rather strong reddish color. No finish coat will stop the reddening.

    There is some argument for using shellac. It is the only product that will redissolve itself should touch up be neccessary where damage occurs. Denatured alcohol will immediately remove the old shellac, one of the reasons shellac is a very bad choice for bar tops. Alcoholic drinks will eat into it!

    Before the advent of modern varnish and urethane finishes, shellac was used commonly for wood flooring and often topped with paste wax, which gave it a buffable shine. I recenting worked in a tudor mansion which had pegged pine flooring. Rather than merely sand it flat, the owners had it hand drawn with curved sc****rs, then stained dark, shellaced and waxed. It was beautiful, but from that time on, we had to take off our shoes anytime we walked on it!

    As to how to apply shellac: there is a wool skin applicator which fits on the end of a broom stick. It is loaded up and then simply drawn across the floor. Home Depot sells them next to the floor coating products in the paint section.

    Personally, I would probably opt for the Bona.
    Last edited by ordjen; 01-04-2015 at 02:44 PM.

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