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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default crack in drywall

    I have a vertical crack in the drywall that keeps on coming back after the joint has been repaired with tape and drywall mud. It appears to be from movement expansion and contraction from the changes in temperatures and seasons. My question is how do repair the wall to keep this from not happening again?
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,070

    Default Re: crack in drywall

    If this is a recurring problem, treat it differently.

    I'd cut the affected drywall to the nearest studs on both sides, check and repair the studs (to make sure it's not sticke in or out) and install a new drywall piece. Then finish and wait.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    253

    Default Re: crack in drywall

    It may not be repairable by taping and mudding.
    Check out The USG Gypsum Construction Handbook glossary under
    Hygrometric Expansion if you are in an area OF high Relative Humidity you may need an expansion joint installed.
    Like in plaster we need expansion joints due to the same reasons.If your wall is 30 linear feet it could have an exspansion of 1/8 inch , the longer the wall the wider the crack.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    975

    Default Re: crack in drywall

    Take off all the drywall, apply 1/2" plywood on studs in a staggered-joint pattern, with glue and nails. Add new drywall to the top of the plywood.
    You now have a shear wall.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,580

    Default Re: crack in drywall

    The gret majority of such cracks are caused by the stresses of settling. Assuing that the house has finally 'settled down". I would try DJ1's solution first - relieve the stress and spred it to the adjoining studs.

    Clarence could be correct. Expansion joints are common and needed where heat and humidity can vary greatly, such as in seasonal summer homes which are not heated in winter. The expansion is just to great for the drywall alone to handle.

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