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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    Default new kitchen lighting

    I am having kitchen remodeled and it's recommended I put in LED recessed lighting. It's a lot more expensive than can lights for incandescent/cfl. I'm looking for advice on which lighting to choose (Have had bad luck with halogen). Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Smile Re: new kitchen lighting

    I'm in the process of replacing ALL of our lighting with LED. It costs more up front BUT you will save a ton of money later, plus they run MUCH cooler.

    Having said that, just like everything else in this world there is good and bad LED lights. All LED will save you money, but some have the wrong color temp and look too yellow. If yours is the right color temp then they are the way to go. They also lasts longer

  3. #3
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    Jul 2010
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    SoCal
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    5,100

    Default Re: new kitchen lighting

    LED will improve and will get less expensive in the coming years. At that point it will make more sense to move to LEDs.
    Right now, the high price makes it irrational. Use the old fashion lighting.

  4. #4
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    Mar 2009
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    wisconsin
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    159

    Default Re: new kitchen lighting

    Im with DJ on this one. Im currently finishing off my basement and didnt even thing of putting anything but normal can lights in. I only use cfls if the room is not on dimmers as well. The upfront costs I feel will not be recouped, and more so they dont have LEDs, and CFLs perfected.

    Once they do have them perfected their will be retro fits to fit your existing can (they already do but I hear nothing great about em)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    203

    Post Re: new kitchen lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by sparky1 View Post
    I only use cfls if the room is not on dimmers
    CFL's contain mercury, radiation and also have been found to cause skin damage. I heard a couple of months ago that they may soon be banned for health reasons in some countries, but they are waiting for LED's to become more cost effective first since incandescents are already being phased out.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Northern Virginia
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    Default Re: new kitchen lighting

    I really hope that the color-correction of LEDs happens sooner. A few years ago both I and my next door neighbors redid our respective kitchens. I used incandescent (halogen) can lights, they used (2006-7) LEDs. The blue glow coming from their windows at night made their house look like a spaceship had landed (we're in a historic district) so the cold-white (blue to me) light of that generation of LEDs was way off; so, too, IMO are the piss-yellow ones. Once they get it right, and they can be cheaply dimmed via wall switches, I'll switch over. Did I mention the price will have to be competitive, too?
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  7. #7
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    Apr 2012
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    203

    Post Re: new kitchen lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by Sombreuil_mongrel View Post
    I really hope that the color-correction of LEDs happens sooner.
    This should be happening very soon, maybe by the end of the year. There is a new company that found a way (patented) to boost the power to the LED's without heating it up. They found a way to keep the LED's cool under this high power condition. Color wise they are perfect and look like natural sunlight. The company is now testing the newly designed bulbs in various hospitals for reliability. They started last year and I haven't heard of any setbacks. They will be available in 100, 75, and 60 watt. Pricing is said to be slightly higher than regular bulbs (a buck or two) which will be offset by all the money saved from them using less electricity. I'm sure other companies are working on the same thing. I bought some GU10 style LED bulbs to light up my stairway around 6 months ago and I couldn't be happier with them. The color is great and they use 95% less power. Once they do that for regular sized bulbs LED's will be standardized.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
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    1,381

    Default Re: new kitchen lighting

    I have been looking at the specs on these LED's and I feel they are a bit misleading. Well more than just a bit really. In big bold print on the front, it will say something like "*compare to a 60 watt incandescent". Note, it does not say "*WHEN compared". just "*compare". So I do and here is what I find.

    A 60 watt soft white bulb is around 800 lumens or so. A 13 watt CFL is around 900 lumens. The LED's I have looked at that say compared to a 60 watt incandescent put out significantly less lumens. They actually are closer to a 40 watt incandescent. when compared by lumen output, the CFL's and LED's are about equal.

    Then there is the flicker problem. Some LED's, especially the cheap ones put out by Lights of America have a flicker like old tubular fluorescents and I believe that can be detrimental to the development of very young children and babies. I see a distinct correlation to the rise in autism and hyperactivity in children as hospitals and schools have switched from natural lighting from windows and incandescent bulbs to fluorescent lights and no windows. While the children may not see the flicker, the rate of flicker is very close to the natural frequency of the nervous system.

    Not all LED's have a flicker problem and most CFLs operate at a flicker that is far higher that we can detect. It depends on the ballast.

    I don't care for this rush into the new lighting. I think that there should be more research done on this flicker problem. BTW, the same thing applies to television sets and small children and babies. The new TV's with the 240 hz refresh rate or higher should be much better around young children.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    203

    Post Re: new kitchen lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by keith3267 View Post
    I have been looking at the specs on these LED's and I feel they are a bit misleading. Well more than just a bit really. In big bold print on the front, it will say something like "*compare to a 60 watt incandescent". Note, it does not say "*WHEN compared". just "*compare".
    This is the same as how some companies rate their amplifier wattages. They would say their product had 100 watts per channel, when it was much less. The way they arrived at that 100 watt figure is by using creative math under made up conditions. Likewise some LED lighting companies rate their bulbs by using short-term (25 milliseconds or less) measurements taken at a calculated temperature (usually 25C) and with a very short pulse of current. The short current pulse keeps the LED cool, and because of that results in higher measured light output. The newer design of LED bulbs that I mentioned earlier will be rated like a typical incandescent lightbulb because heat will not be an issue. Having said that all light sources diminish in output over their operating life, even regular lightbulbs. If you buy a new 60 watt incandescent light bulb and compare the light output to an old one, you will find that they put out two different levels of light. Most LED bulbs currently on the market are rated around 10% higher light output than what they actually are. Most people don't notice this as much as the offset in color temperature issue in some bulbs.

    I think that there should be more research done on this flicker problem. BTW, the same thing applies to television sets and small children and babies. The new TV's with the 240 hz refresh rate or higher should be much better around young children.
    I agree 110%. I don't think it's going to happen though. I can tell you that having studied health care for over 35 years that it's not whats safe or not safe that makes it to market, but what big corporations decide they want to sell. Research costs money and the ones with the money tend to want to keep things that are unsafe or that might hamper sales quite.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    3

    Default Re: new kitchen lighting

    My contractor has said that code requires that either I put in LED or the fluorescent can with snap-in plugs, that I can't replace my existing 4-ft tube fluorescent fixtures with anything that I can screw in a standard bulb( California). Prices are close to same. I hate the fact that they haven't really researched the LEDs enough but are forcing us to use them at a huge price difference. Even the cfls I've used don't perform as well or last as well as they say. If I was doing the work myself it might be different. Any suggestions?

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