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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    133

    Default electric baseboard heating

    If I want to replace my base-board heating which have rusted and
    are dirty is there something in particular I need to consider before buying them like wire gauge. I don't want to cause any fire.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    boston,ma
    Posts
    114

    Cool Re: electric baseboard heating

    If you are replacing the units with the same style,length and wattage units you may be able to use the same wiring if it has not deteriorated, if you want to rewire then, most baseboard units use 12-2 wire,most 6-8 foot units are less than 3,000 watts, so use romex or mc, depending on local codes,ask your electrican if you are not sure about the condition of the wire, or have him make the final connections, these units smell awful when first used due to the oil they coat the parts with, so be ready to open the windows and ventilate the space, there are not many choices for electric resistance heating, they do have some hydronic electric baseboards now that have a liquid filled heat exchanger and keep the temp. more comfortable, but they are expensive. Good Luck !

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Needham, MA
    Posts
    559

    Default Re: electric baseboard heating

    that is something i would highly recommend you have an electrician do to make sure that everything is up to code and safe. electric baseboards are a popular fire starter.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Columbiana, Alabama
    Posts
    738

    Default Re: electric baseboard heating

    Good points. Also, don't allow a baseboard heater to be mounted below a receptacle, a cord might hang down and melt.

    This could present a problem because a receptacle should be mounted every 12 ft along a wall. They make baseboard heaters with a receptacle mounted in the middle to eliminate this violation.

    Other points:
    1) Fixed electric space-heaters are considered continuous loads so even if the wire is #12 and it's on a 20A breaker the heater can't be rated more than 16A.

    2) The heater literature will list how close to combustible material it can be located.

    3) Be sure the heater has an "off" position on the thermostat and opens both hot wires or it will need a disconnect.

    4)Make sure the electrician does not try to put all your heaters on a breaker larger than 60A.
    Good Luck from Columbiana, Alabama
    Maurice Turgeon, Hidden Content

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