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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    14

    Default Sanding between coats

    I'm painting my wood pine doors white. I have the doors primed and am wondering what grit of sand paper i should use to smooth out my door before i do my first coat. Also should i sand the door between first and second coats? Any other tips/steps i should do while painting these doors? Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    975

    Default Re: Sanding between coats

    Use 220 for smoothing the primer and between coats, the latter only if necessary.
    Tips: paint the panels first; use a roller to get paint on the door rapidly, then immediately use a good brush to smooth it out. If your paint is drying very fast, wipe any excess overage that gets on the stiles and rails, otherwise they will not blend. Do the stiles and rails always with the grain, which means in the specific order dictated by the pattern of the door; the short stiles between panels get done first, so the brushstrokes of the next frame parts will catch their overages. The side stiles are always the last to be painted, as they catch the overages of the rails.
    Another tip: remove the knobs and mask the hinges.
    In hot weather you need to work like mad to keep ahead of the drying paint and get a neat job.
    Or, rent an HVLP sprayer and avoid those headaches.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    19

    Default Re: Sanding between coats

    No need to sand at all when using latex paint. Application is the key. Use one of those sponge 6" rollers that apply the paint smoothly with no nap.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,583

    Default Re: Sanding between coats

    The biggest problem with brushing acrylic, water based enamels, is its very fast setting time. You have to ignore that urge to think if you keep brushing it, the brush marks will appear better. Too much brushing actually degrades the final result. This is an real problem for old guys like me who were raised on slow drying oil paints. Acrylic paints will level themselves, but it only has a couple minutes to do it before it skins over. Roll it, level it with your brush and LEAVE IT ALONE!

    Better yet, take MCDANIELS' advice and get hold of some spray equipment.

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