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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    14

    Default Shower head restrictor

    I have single handle pfister that I had put in. The plumber put in the cartridge and I put in the rest. I really like the way it looks but not how the shower head works because of the water pressure restrictor. When I unscrewed the shower head, I found an o-ring that was blocking this green thing with holes in it. I removed the o-ring and the pressure improved some but was still weak. I noticed that the green thing has 4 tabs that fit into hole of the washer blocking most of the water. What water that does goes though these little holes . I tried to remove it with small flathead but it won't budge. I'm thinking of getting out my drill but I don't want to damage the showerhead. How do I remove this thing?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
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    6,305

    Default Re: Shower head restrictor

    Today's shower heads are designed to deliver 2.5 gallons per minute or less. This is a water saving thing.

    Why don't you do this simple test: remove the shower head, but not the neck, then run the water and see if you get a good flow.

    If yes, install another shower head.

    If no, you may have a blockage in the riser to the head. What kind of piping do you have?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    14

    Default Re: Shower head restrictor

    Quote Originally Posted by dj1 View Post
    Today's shower heads are designed to deliver 2.5 gallons per minute or less. This is a water saving thing.

    Why don't you do this simple test: remove the shower head, but not the neck, then run the water and see if you get a good flow.

    If yes, install another shower head.

    If no, you may have a blockage in the riser to the head. What kind of piping do you have?
    Hi dij,

    I guess I'm not explaining this right. There is nothing wrong with the flow already tested it. The shower head had an o-ring that covered the green water pressure restrictor which I removed. This did help a little but not a enough. I also noticed that there 4 tabs the protrude from the green water pressure restrictor that prevent the main flow of water. What water does get through goes through these little holes in the green water pressure restrictor.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,305

    Default Re: Shower head restrictor

    Replace the shower head.

    At less than $10 they're not worth your time.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Shower head restrictor

    Quote Originally Posted by dj1 View Post
    Replace the shower head.

    At less than $10 they're not worth your time.
    Maybe not to you but I spent $150 on this thing and I am now unemployed. So yes, I would like to know to safely remove it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,936

    Default Re: Shower head restrictor

    If the restrictor is in the threaded portion that screws onto the shower neck sticking out of the wall, then it should come out. Use the tip of a pocket knife or similar small but strong item to get under the edge and pull it out.

    If that doesn't work, then carefully go at it with a drill bit. Start small, maybe an 1/8" bit and test your work. If you like what you've got, stop, if you want more, drill a little larger hole.

    IMHO, what good is a "water saver" shower head when it cuts the water flow in half which requires a shower twice as long to get the job done? Don't get me wrong, water saver devices are a good thing, but often times they are ill conceived, designed, and implemented.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Shower head restrictor

    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spruce View Post
    If the restrictor is in the threaded portion that screws onto the shower neck sticking out of the wall, then it should come out. Use the tip of a pocket knife or similar small but strong item to get under the edge and pull it out.

    If that doesn't work, then carefully go at it with a drill bit. Start small, maybe an 1/8" bit and test your work. If you like what you've got, stop, if you want more, drill a little larger hole.

    IMHO, what good is a "water saver" shower head when it cuts the water flow in half which requires a shower twice as long to get the job done? Don't get me wrong, water saver devices are a good thing, but often times they are ill conceived, designed, and implemented.
    Actually , I have a handheld and the flow restrictor is in the neck part of the showerhead. I'm going to break the 4 plastic tabs and start out with a small hole like suggested. Thank you.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Shower head restrictor

    A.Spruce, just wanted to thank you again. Took my first decent shower since I got this thing hook up. I was actually late for church.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,565

    Default Re: Shower head restrictor

    Some people aren't satisfied with a "gentle rain" shower which is all most new showerheads will deliver! Think pressure washer. Somehow, 2.5 GPM just isn't going to cut it. It's not about effectiveness of cleaning, but about how it feels; invigorating you with a thousand needles pelting your skin. It's a mental well-being thing.

    The unfortunate thing about limiting showerhead flow rates on a national basis is that it fails to take into account the differing availability of water and fuel resources in different parts of the country. I understand the need for water conservation, especially during drought conditions or on shared systems where conservation can reduce the need for infrastructure expansion. But for those of us in damper regions drawing from underutilized and overstocked aquifers, it really doesn't make any difference to the environment if I use a few extra gallons in my daily shower.

    Sure, there is some extra expense in electricity (or gas) for heating the water. But since I get my power from Columbia River hydroelectric dams, the water either goes through the turbines or it goes over the spillway. Might as well get some work out of it. It doesn't make much difference to the fish which path the water takes*, and it's a zero-emission, renewable resource.

    As for faucet aerators that limit flow, I don't have a problem with them. The work of washing is done with scrubbing, not with water flow. Once the dirt's loose, it doesn't take much water to wash it away.

    P.S. -- I know dams are a hot topic in the environmental movement. I'm referring to the path of the water flow through the dam, not to the existence of the dam itself. Sure, the dams themselves have an effect on migratory fish runs, but the path the water takes through the dam is mostly irrelevant to those same runs.
    Last edited by Fencepost; 07-24-2012 at 03:15 AM.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

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