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Thread: 20 yr old deck

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Huntersville, NC
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    Wink 20 yr old deck

    I plan to use and oil based stain on it. is there something that I should put on the wood before I apply the stain. THanks!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    SoCal
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    Default Re: 20 yr old deck

    Yes, put on a deck cleaner, to remove dirt and junk off the planks.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: 20 yr old deck

    Thanks. I will clean the deck but was wondering if I should put something before the stain.

  4. #4
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    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
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    Default Re: 20 yr old deck

    davidhutch,

    If you mean something like a pre-stain sealer , as is used with interior stains on soft woods, the answer is no. Exterior stains are not normally wiping stains, as are interior stains. If a stain is brushed and not wiped, it will not look blotchy.

    One caveate is that excess oil must not be left on the surface, especially if the oil contains linseed oil. You want to give the deck a generous brushing with the oil, letting the deck absorb all the oil it wants. If however, after about 15 minutes you see oil still standing on the surface, you should wipe the excess off with a rag or paper towels. If you don't, you risk it staying sticky for months!

    If the deck shows dry looking spots right after brushing on the oil, you can give it more oil while it is wet. But again, do not let excess oil remain on the surface.

    One last warning: if you wipe the stain, be very careful with the rags, especially with linseed oil. It will self ignite if wadded up and thrown in a container! Throw the rags out on the lawn for a couple hours until the solvents have evaporated. Even then, it is a good idea to put them in a sealed metal can. Should they ignite there, they will rapidly starve for air.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: 20 yr old deck

    THanks ! For the great info. Do you recommend a brand?
    Last edited by davidhutch; 07-17-2012 at 09:42 PM.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: 20 yr old deck

    I have personally used a lot of Cabot's and Sikkens over the years with very good results. I have heard much good about Penofin. These can be a little pricey.

    I should add a little more about oil stains. First, the more pigmented versions will give better performance, i.e. semi-transparent protects better than transparent. It is the pigment which stops the Sun's UV rays. Clear oils give by far the poorest protection.

    Transparent versions will allow more of the grain to show through. Also, over the years, after several refresher coats, it will still allow the grain to show, albeit it will get darker with each coat. The more pigmented stains will start to look opaqueish.

    Oils generally will not last as long as some of the water based stains. Oils will require yearly or bi-yearly refresher coats. The good news is that they do not form a surface film which can peel, as do many of the water based stains. You will never have to strip an oil product because it does not form a film. However, do not neglect keeping it refreshed.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    10

    Default Re: 20 yr old deck

    I will clean the deck but was wondering if I should put something before the stain.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Default Re: 20 yr old deck

    Pat,

    If the deck is clean, not grayed and the old finish is gone, you should be ready to go.

    If you are just refreshing a surface where oil stain has been used, there should be no problem. I would not , however, go over residual latex/acrylic stain, as the oil will not be able to penetrate the surface. It will just sit on top and not dry. If such is the case, it is best to strip the deck first.

    Of course, if you are using a transparent oil stain, any residual old oil stain will show through the new coat. It is a good idea to stick with the same color for this reason.

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