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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6

    Default Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    I am installing a prefab fiberglass shower enclosure and am unsure if I should use concrete board or green board on the top of the shower enclosure. I know if I were to tile the whole shower I should use concrete board. However, where it is a prefab shower and I am going to paint the wall and ceiling of the shower should I still be using concrete board? Another question is, how would I transition nicely from the shower to the wall board?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    7,760

    Default Re: Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    If you are not going to tile above the bath enclosure, you don't need to use a cement board. Remember: no green board on the ceiling.

    Keep in mind that no drywall can stop moisture, so use a moisture barrier accordingly.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,900

    Default Re: Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    As for how to transition: most shower enclosures I've seen have a nailing flange around the edge. I'm assuming yours does, too.

    There are two ways I've seen to get a nice transition:
    1. Use furring strips on the studs to build the wall out so the furring strips are flush with the nailing flange. Then overlap the greenboard over the nailing flange, up to the finished edge of the enclosure
    2. Butt the greenboard up to -- but not over -- the nailing flange. Then use "hot mud" (not premix) and fiberglass mesh joint tape to fill in over the nailing flange. Using a sealing primer will help the water resistance.


    The disadvantage of #1 is that you have to build out the walls (sometimes as much as 1/2" or more if the enclosure is much smaller than the space), and this may not be feasible in your situation.

    The disadvantage of #2 is that it is more difficult as you have to sculpt quick-setting mud into a smooth surface.

    ("Hot mud" is a cement-like product based on Plaster of Paris. It actually cures rather than dries, so the end product is more moisture resistant than premix joint compound. The term "hot" refers to the fact that it heats up as it cures.)
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    Thank you DJ and Fencepost. What would you recommend for the ceiling in a bathroom and shower stall? I had been planning to use the green board. I'm glad you told me I shouldn't.

    And Fencepost, how hard is #2 to make a clean unnoticeable finish?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    7,760

    Default Re: Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    Quote Originally Posted by GFrazier View Post
    Thank you DJ and Fencepost. What would you recommend for the ceiling in a bathroom and shower stall? I had been planning to use the green board. I'm glad you told me I shouldn't.

    And Fencepost, how hard is #2 to make a clean unnoticeable finish?
    Regular drywall on the entire ceiling.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    Sorry to bring up an old thread, but I am in this situation now. I like the idea of the hot mud, but was wondering f there was an instructional video out there showing the process?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    My first response disapeared.....

    OK, so do you fill in over the flange all they way to the edge of the suround, or do you still leave a gap?

    is it about the same consistancy as the premix joint compound?

    Do i need to do anything special so it holds form while wet? or can I just fill in the gap with a half inch of the stuff to bring it out to the drywall and it will hold?

    I'm such a visual person, I wish I could just find a video example.

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