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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    6

    Default Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    I am installing a prefab fiberglass shower enclosure and am unsure if I should use concrete board or green board on the top of the shower enclosure. I know if I were to tile the whole shower I should use concrete board. However, where it is a prefab shower and I am going to paint the wall and ceiling of the shower should I still be using concrete board? Another question is, how would I transition nicely from the shower to the wall board?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
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    6,530

    Default Re: Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    If you are not going to tile above the bath enclosure, you don't need to use a cement board. Remember: no green board on the ceiling.

    Keep in mind that no drywall can stop moisture, so use a moisture barrier accordingly.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,605

    Default Re: Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    As for how to transition: most shower enclosures I've seen have a nailing flange around the edge. I'm assuming yours does, too.

    There are two ways I've seen to get a nice transition:
    1. Use furring strips on the studs to build the wall out so the furring strips are flush with the nailing flange. Then overlap the greenboard over the nailing flange, up to the finished edge of the enclosure
    2. Butt the greenboard up to -- but not over -- the nailing flange. Then use "hot mud" (not premix) and fiberglass mesh joint tape to fill in over the nailing flange. Using a sealing primer will help the water resistance.


    The disadvantage of #1 is that you have to build out the walls (sometimes as much as 1/2" or more if the enclosure is much smaller than the space), and this may not be feasible in your situation.

    The disadvantage of #2 is that it is more difficult as you have to sculpt quick-setting mud into a smooth surface.

    ("Hot mud" is a cement-like product based on Plaster of Paris. It actually cures rather than dries, so the end product is more moisture resistant than premix joint compound. The term "hot" refers to the fact that it heats up as it cures.)
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    Thank you DJ and Fencepost. What would you recommend for the ceiling in a bathroom and shower stall? I had been planning to use the green board. I'm glad you told me I shouldn't.

    And Fencepost, how hard is #2 to make a clean unnoticeable finish?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,530

    Default Re: Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    Quote Originally Posted by GFrazier View Post
    Thank you DJ and Fencepost. What would you recommend for the ceiling in a bathroom and shower stall? I had been planning to use the green board. I'm glad you told me I shouldn't.

    And Fencepost, how hard is #2 to make a clean unnoticeable finish?
    Regular drywall on the entire ceiling.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    Sorry to bring up an old thread, but I am in this situation now. I like the idea of the hot mud, but was wondering f there was an instructional video out there showing the process?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,173

    Default Re: Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    Hi,
    The process for Durabond (setting-type joint compound) is to mix the powder with water until smooth (not too lumpy), apply before it hardens in the bucket/mud pan. Apply smoothly because it is like cement when set, IOW you can't sand it. It does come off w/a sharp paint scr-aper.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,048

    Default Re: Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    Quote Originally Posted by Sombreuil_mongrel View Post
    Hi,
    The process for Durabond (setting-type joint compound) is to mix the powder with water until smooth (not too lumpy), apply before it hardens in the bucket/mud pan. Apply smoothly because it is like cement when set, IOW you can't sand it. It does come off w/a sharp paint scr-aper.
    Casey
    This was definitely true a few years ago, however, I just bought a bag of 45 minute set and it sands rather easily. The 20 minute probably won't, which is what I normally use.

    Things I've noticed over the years with setting type compound:
    1 - The amount of water you add will affect setting time, the runnier it is, the longer working time you'll have. The dryer it is, the shorter working time.
    2 - The ambient temperature of the room you're working in will affect working time, hot room, short work time, cool room, much longer.
    3 - Temperature of the water used will affect the setting time, cool = longer, hot = shorter.

    Always apply only what you need, excess only creates more work later to sand off or feather out. Try to apply as smoothly as possible, again, less work later to cover or sand a crappy application.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,775

    Default Re: Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    The Durabond marked "Easy Sand" does indeed sand easily, once it has thoroughly dried, not just hardened. If you sand too soon, it clogs up your sandpaper. When dry, it dusts up like other patchng compounds.

    "Easy Sand 20' was my patching compound of choice for years. I liked powder compounds because they would not freeze in my truck on a cold Chicago night. I found its adhesion better than other products too. As Spruce says, you can alter its characteristics by alterring water temperature when mixing. A hair dryer really speeds up the setting too.

    Unlike a lot of products, a deep patch does not shrink up and crack while drying. It also dries in the same time whether thin or thick.

    It is almost like it has an internal time clock. You will be working away with no problems, and then within a minute or so, it hardens.

    I always mixed it in flexible plastic contaniners. Once hard, it will crack cleanly out. I would use two containers, allowing one to harden to where the Easy Sand would crack out cleanly, while I utilized the other container.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Drywalling Around a Shower Enclosure

    Thanks, but I more ment how do I shape it and get it to hold to make a clean edge next to the surround. I feel like If I just started slapping it in, it would just end running down to the suround edge.

    Or becuase of it's make up do I not need to leave the gap at the top edge of the surround?

    DO I have to put it on in layers?

    Does it end up being the same consistancy as the premixed joint compound?

    Thanks for the advice, I just want to make sure I fully understand prior to starting. That's why I really would love to find a video of someone doing it.

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