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Thread: Voltage Drop?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,710

    Default Re: Voltage Drop?

    kbuy999, none of this has any bearing on your problem. I do not work on submersible pumps, but I don't think I've ever heard of a submersible pump having a capacitor, just jet pumps. The cost of pulling the pump for this problem is just not justified, but, you may be in the beginning phases of a pump failure.

    I have a submersible pump for my well and I have a UPS. The pump has never cause a voltage drop for me. A voltage drop of this magnitude tells me that the pump has a lot of drag, causing a much higher than normal inrush current and thus the excessive voltage drop. This is only a theory though, but if I were you, I'd start budgeting for a new pump, and if it turns out that you don't need one, then use the money for a vacation.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,577

    Default Re: Voltage Drop?

    Quote Originally Posted by keith3267 View Post
    ...I don't think I've ever heard of a submersible pump having a capacitor, just jet pumps.

    ...if I were you, I'd start budgeting for a new pump, and if it turns out that you don't need one, then use the money for a vacation.
    I believe most submersible pumps have capacitors. If the pump is a "two wire" pump (red & black plus green ground going down the well) the capacitor will be on the pump motor; the pump must be pulled for repair.

    If it's a "three wire" pump (red, black, & yellow plus green), then there will be a control box above ground that contains the capacitor. Pulling the pump is not necessary for capacitor replacement.

    If you do have to have the pump pulled, the labor in doing that is so great you are money ahead to simply replace the pump at that time so you don't have to pay even more labor so soon down the road when the pump ultimately fails.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Voltage Drop?

    I can pull the pump on my own thats no problem the Well Driller showed me how when he put it in. And I have since pulled it out once on my own with know problem. it is a 3 wire pump.

    One thing I have figured out in the past 2 days is that I believe my pressure tank is shot. It is not holding air for more than a month or so. So that needs to be replaced regardless. I guess I will start saving for a new pump just to be safe.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,710

    Default Re: Voltage Drop?

    "One thing I have figured out in the past 2 days is that I believe my pressure tank is shot. It is not holding air for more than a month or so. So that needs to be replaced regardless. I guess I will start saving for a new pump just to be safe."

    Unless you have a bladder type tank, this would be normal. Water absorbs air. All you need is one of those air injector systems that adds a little bit of air every time the pump runs. They only cost a couple of dollars.

    As for the pump, if you had a new one installed recently, there shouldn't be anything wrong with it. Mine is around 40 years old and still going strong. Two things you can do, one is, when the tank has a proper air charge, is to time how long it takes the pump to refill the tank from the low pressure to the high pressure settings on the controller. Your well driller should be able to tell if the time is about right for the depth of the well.

    If you know someone with a clamp on ammeter, then measure the run current to see if that is consistent with the pump motor specs. If the pump is fairly new and it is drawing too much current or taking too long to fill, it may have a manufacturing defect or it got something stuck in the pump vanes when it was first installed.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Voltage Drop?

    I do have a bladder type tank. So this is probably shot. The pump is going on 15 years old. But I will get my buddies Amp meter and check that out. I still have the paperwork for the pump so I should be able to find the specs and check it against the reading. Thanks for the ideas.

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