+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    25

    Question Best way to strip years of paint and stain--89yr. old house

    We have an 89 year old house. Our backroom, unheated, has many layers of paint, primer and varnish and stain. At the presernt time there are signs of alligatoring. Since it is unheated, except for a portable heater, we would like to strip the old finishes off and put a clear coat finish over the wood. My question, anyone have a safe way to do this AT HOME? Planning to do this in the early Spring.
    STLOUIEY
    "The best house is an old house." "You can't fix stupid!"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,794

    Default Re: Best way to strip years of paint and stain--89yr. old house

    John Home,

    Ultimately you will have to use a chemical stripper to get back down to bare wood. However, where there is a thick paint build-up, heat guns are often effective. The heat gun can get the majority of the paint off, leaving only a thin, relatively easy coat to strip off with chemicals.

    If the woodwork was originally varnished, cleaning it up enough to re-varnish it will be somewhat easier since paint pigment from subsequent paint jobs will not have gotten deep into the grain of the wood.

    If the woodwork was originally painted, you may not be able to clean the wood enough to look good with stain and varnish.

    If you are not re-finishing the floors, you will want to protect them with a double layer of rosin paper and triple tape the edges. Stripper will eat through only one or two layers of tape. I use blue tape for the original taping to the floor and then top it with two layers of regular masking tape.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Boston, MA USA
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Best way to strip years of paint and stain--89yr. old house

    I have a 1921 dutch colonial that has years of paint. I'd like to strip the paint off and use stain to reduce future maintnance costs. The question is how can I make sure that the chemical stripper is properly neutralized so that the stain will not end up peeling?

    thank you.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,794

    Default Re: Best way to strip years of paint and stain--89yr. old house

    If you are using a methylene chloride based stripper, merely wiping down the stripped wood with lacquer thinner or alcohol will remove the residue wax which might hinder the adhesion of the new finish. I have never had a problem when doing this.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Best way to strip years of paint and stain--89yr. old house

    I have been working hard to find a way to strip off several coats of oil, lead, milk and latex paint off of our woodwork. To date, I have not found one method that removes all traces of paint. Each layer, because of it's different make-up, requires a different strategy. Sometimes the chemical stripper does it, sometimes the heat gun, sometimes a plain old razor blade sc****r. But in the end I'm always left with a piece of trim which still has the paint residue in the grain, or a cloudy finish that won't come off. I've lost hope that anything will work, and resigned myself to just starting over with a new coat of paint.

    So you're mileage may vary, and I wish you the best!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Best way to strip years of paint and stain--89yr. old house

    Wife and I used a product we found at THE HOME DEPOT - called CITRISTRIP. (not positive I spelled the name correctly) It really worked well...was easy to apply, as long as one doesn't mind a goopy substance sitting on a surface for about 30 minutes, then using a putty knife and a fair amount of paper towels to wipe it off the putty knife. We merely closed the door to the room where we used it to keep the cat from getting curious. The odor like oranges was not overpowering or lingering. We did have a fan in the window using the mineral spirits: Its odor was much stronger than the product. It was not cheap, but not outlandishly priced either. The BEST was that NO DUST while removing the goop was created. I would for sure read the container and see if it has anything on it about removing stains, etc. It worked very well on the multiple layers of paint that went back at least 60 years. I know wife applied the whole process (goop it, sc**** it, clean w/ spirits) 2 or 3 times. The wood cleaned for fresh paint with mineral spirits easily. We did NOT try it on fancy trimwork with lots of nooks, crannies, curves...I would imagine that would be more challenging.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •