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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    14

    Default Wood panel walls

    When skimming wood panel walls with sheetrock mud is there any special tricks/techniques i should know about? all i really need to fill is the cracks right? Basically asking the entrie wall won't be white with mud when i'm done right?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,163

    Default Re: Wood panel walls

    Why not pull the paneling down and repair the wall?

    The quality of the finish will only be as good as the substrate, and paneling is a poor substrate for any coating. Remove the paneling, repair the wall, and then texture/paint. It will look much better and you will be proud to say that you did it yourself.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Elyria, Oh.
    Posts
    245

    Default Re: Wood panel walls

    You can make paneling look like drywall if done right. Wash the paneling, scratch it up with some fine grit sandpaper, prime and mud the cracks and then prime and paint the paneling. This depends on the quality of the wall underneath the paneling. If it is in good shape you can remove the paneling and repair the wall as the previous post suggests.

    I was looking at around 7000 square feet in five central hallways in my 99 year old apartment building and after I pulled one piece of paneling done and took a look at the wall behind it I quickly put it back up. The mess and quantity of debris would have been horrendous. Fourteen years later it looks like drywall and only an expert can see the difference and it has held up well. The choice is yours depending on your available time, skills etc.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,699

    Default Re: Wood panel walls

    Yes, removing the panels and fixing the drywall is the way to go in your case.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    14

    Default Re: Wood panel walls

    I can take the paneling off but there is only 1/4" sheetrock under it so i would add a layer of 3/8" or 1/2"??? and i would have to fur out a door, a window, and extend electrical boxes in the room. I would like to stay away from that but if it is bad news skimming the paneling it isn't that big of a deal.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    SoCal
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    6,699

    Default Re: Wood panel walls

    Quote Originally Posted by jfgrabe View Post
    I can take the paneling off but there is only 1/4" sheetrock under it so i would add a layer of 3/8" or 1/2"??? and i would have to fur out a door, a window, and extend electrical boxes in the room. I would like to stay away from that but if it is bad news skimming the paneling it isn't that big of a deal.
    With this new information:

    I'd add 1/3" drywall. You can get by with that. The other option will be to rip the 1/4" drywall, and to install 1/2" - more work and mess, but it will allow you to inspect the wall or do some electrical and other modifications.

    Your call.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,969

    Default Re: Wood panel walls

    Drywall less than 1/2" very well could violate the fire code for your fair city. It would be a good idea to check with your local building authority to see what thickness will be required for the remodeling.

    Open walls also give you a chance to upgrade your electric, plumbing, AV, and insulation.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,163

    Default Re: Wood panel walls

    Why do I get the sneaking suspicion that you're in a trailer ... mobile home ... manufactured home, whatever you want to call the damn things.

    Not sure what your budget or intentions are. As was earlier suggested, you could skim out what you have if the cost/mess/time of total replacement isn't possible. You will want to rough sand the surface to give the skim coat something to stick to. I would even go so far as to recommend taping the seams or the paneling joints will crack in short order.

    I personally don't see much benefit to removing the paneling and then overlaying with drywall. If you're going to go to that much work and effort, strip the walls to bare studs and just install one layer of 1/2" or 5/8", whichever you need to be flush with existing outlets and jambs. By going this route, you can also inspect and upgrade everything that is in the walls, plumbing, electrical, insulation, etc. This is also the perfect time to add any additional needs such as tv, computer, or phone cables.

    Can you give us more info as to the type of home you have and what it is that you are trying to accomplish. A budget would be helpful too.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

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