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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default Best Siding to use to warm the home

    I want to heat the front rooms of my home and am trying to figure out the best siding to use to do so. Aluminum or Vinyl? Advice?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Needham, MA
    Posts
    559

    Default Re: Best Siding to use to warm the home

    never heard of a siding that heats a house. the only thing i would recommend is the color as opposed to the material. the darker the color the warmer the wall will get, the lighter the color the cooler the wall will stay. i don't think that there's too many people here who will refute that point.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    nova scotia, canada
    Posts
    1,522

    Default Re: Best Siding to use to warm the home

    if your talking about a exterior finish that actually warms the house brick is what you want. it absorbs heat during the day then gives it off at night

    if your referring to siding that give the house a "warm feeling" meaning the appearance you want wood not vinyl or aluminum
    fire up the saw and make some dust

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Best Siding to use to warm the home

    Talking about economically which also helps in decrease in energy bill, there is one available option is installed foam backed vinyl siding which reduces the amount of air flow into your house and keep it warm.

    Another option is which is booming nowadays is fiber cement siding which is environmentally friendly too.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    nova scotia, canada
    Posts
    1,522

    Default Re: Best Siding to use to warm the home

    foam backed siding only adds a very minimal r-value to the exising insulation. in order to get a truly effective thermal break on the outside of the building you need a minimum of 1" foam to go on before the siding goes up

    fibre cement is popular however its extremely dirty to cut and has health risks for the installer if they arent taking proper precautions.. very few installers use shears to cut it, most just use a circular saw. not to mention its considered the modern version of asbestos shingles because of all the silica in it.
    fire up the saw and make some dust

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