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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2

    Default Wall is curving out

    The upper section of my bathroom wall is curving outwards (convex). The curved section begins at the ceiling and runs 36" down by 54" across and curves across the 54" length. The wall is comprised of drywall and you can see the curve running against the ceiling as well (again, it curves gently across 54").


    I noticed this when I was trying to install a new towel rack (the two base ends would not stay flush against the wall). Currently, I have a towel rack installed on the lower half of the wall, which is not curved, but would love to get this fixed so that I can finally get the new one installed higher up.

    Is there any way I can make the wall flat enough to install the new towel rack? Thank you!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,089

    Default Re: Wall is curving out

    To make the wall flat, you will have to fix the framing. A good framer can help you with this. It involves removing the drywall.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,363

    Default Re: Wall is curving out

    Many times we run into the same problem when tiling a shower. All during construction the house is left outside where it rains and snows. To make matters worse, the guys at the lumber yard deliver whatever 2x4's are on the top of the pile. The framers grab the next one and nail it into place. Someone may or may not have a level handy.

    To fix the problem the drywall comes down and the nails / screws removed. Then using an electric power planer, shave the wall studs down to perfect plumbness. Or as close to it as you want to get.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    nova scotia, canada
    Posts
    1,522

    Default Re: Wall is curving out

    a good framer will use good studs for bathroom and kitchen walls along with door rough openings. this will make for a straighter wall

    when a stud does get installed that has a crown, a method that works well is to remove the drywall and saw kerf the stud on a hard angle then drive a screw into it to lock it back together. this will take the tension out of the wood and create a flater wall
    fire up the saw and make some dust

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