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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    3

    Default OLD Original Bathvalves.

    Any recognize this?
    House built 1926 Lexington KY

    My plumber said he couldn't seem to find a build kit for it. Wanted to redo my bath to code. etc. Local expert plumbing shop described it as a milwaukee valve.

    From what I've seen when I take them apart there is what I would describe as a iron nipple that would rust out.

    I am not a plumber, help advice please.






    Chris Harn
    Last edited by harncw; 04-20-2012 at 11:29 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,481

    Default Re: OLD Original Bathvalves.

    Old style valves like that use a rubber washer on the end of the stem to seal against the seat. The shaft of the stem is sealed with either a fiber washer or lead rope. The major problem that I see is the leak on the back side, which due to the way the valve is installed, can't be fixed, at least not easily.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,558

    Default Re: OLD Original Bathvalves.

    I would question the competency of a plumber that doesn't know about faucet washers and seats.

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: OLD Original Bathvalves.

    I got another plumber coming.

    The back green spot is not really an active leak.
    The leak is around the bottom cold valve, water seeps in and drips down the concrete the tile is set in.
    Last edited by harncw; 04-20-2012 at 01:46 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,481

    Default Re: OLD Original Bathvalves.

    I second Jack's comment about the first plumbers incompetency. He may have been giving you a line just so as not to have to mess with it, those can be a pain at times. Hopefully plumber #2 will be able to change out the seals for you without complaint.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,084

    Default Re: OLD Original Bathvalves.

    Parts are available, but they may not be so cheap. You've got to know where to look for them.

    These old faucets were pretty reliable at one point in history, but like so many other things, their time has passed. If it were me, I'd replace everything, since the wall is already open. I'd get rid of all galvanized pipes and nipple and switch to copper. Galvanized can't last hundreds of years. Sooner or later all galvanized will be replaced, so why wait? copper will go up in price - replace it now, so you won't say years later "I should have done it in 2012". Depending on where you live, PEX could be used, a little less expensive and faster to install, except not as good IMHO.

    Get some bid for a repipe job.

    BTW, this is what your first plumber wanted to do...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,558

    Default Re: OLD Original Bathvalves.

    dj1 has his opinion, mine is that I prefer the old washer type valves, washers and seat are cheap and easy to replace. Of course updating you could have a temp control valve installed. I do agree with replacing the galvanized pipes though.

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,096

    Default Re: OLD Original Bathvalves.

    I too like rebuildable valves, but only for use by knowledgeable owners who want to keep the historical value of what they have. I also agree with getting rid of all the galvanized piping which isn't normally visible anyway. If you use them as intended, old valves such as these can be used forever or until parts can no longer be had. No modern valves will come close to this longevity as designs change too often, manufacturers go out of business, and no longevity was expected to the degree the old ones were designed to.

    Still, most people will be better served by the new products. They will crank down too hard on a dripping valve instead of rebuilding it, they will accept leaks and dripping as normal which will destroy other things, and they will not understand the limitations of non-temperature regulated valves.

    The choice is yours to make, but as good as the rest looks you have an excellent chance to maintain history if you want to. Once you change to modern valves that becomes a permanently lost option as building codes will not allow a return to them thereafter. If you decide to keep them (and I hope you do) find an old plumber who understands these and befriend him. Find his sources and gain his knowledge and as long as he wants it, give him your business in return for the knowledge imparted because it has great value to you.

    Phil

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