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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2

    Default persnickety old paint

    Our house is 30 years old and the orginal builder used exterior plastic epoxy paint (this has been determened by experienced old painters - they didn't know how to handle this either) on all interior trim and doors. We have tried sanding and using Zinzer 123 and like primers, but the new paint just peals off. We have also tried several paint removers and it will remove the new paint but will not touch the old paint. Have tried to sand off the old paint with a belt sander and circler sander, still won't come off, just gums up on the sandpaper. We are replacing most of the trim but the windows have to stay and we have about 18 solid wood doors with panels that we would like to keep because of replacement cost.

    Any help would be appreciated. Would like to finish this project in my life time and time is getting short (63 and counting).

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,557

    Default Re: persnickety old paint

    This from another web site-
    Question - What type of solvants can be used to dissolve epoxy
    after it has completely cured?
    ------------------------------------------------
    The short answer is almost none. Fully cured epoxy is one of the most
    solvent polymer systems known. It can be softened by very strong, but
    difficult to handle, solvents like dimethylformamide, but because of its
    high [essentially infinite] molecular weight and inherent chemical
    resistance it is practically not removable by chemical means.

    Vince Calder
    ================================================== =======
    Ha, Ha, Ha. Cured epoxy can't be dissolved, because it's one giant
    interconnected molecule. The best you can hope for is to physically or
    chemically break it into smaller pieces. Not many chemicals will do that,
    either. Concentrated sulfuric acid will do the job, but it takes a ling
    time. Other things that might do the job are even more dangerous to work
    with.

    Richard Barrans, Ph. D.
    Assistant Director, PG Research Foundation
    Darien, Illinois

    I would suggest you might try non-clogging Stearated Aluminum Oxide discs. Another choice would be flap sheets or flutter wheels which run cooler and are much less likely to melt the epoxy and clog.

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2

    Post Re: persnickety old paint

    Thanks for the info. Have tried the flap sheets but it was hard on the insets on the 6 panel doors. Will give the Aluminum discs a try. This has been a nightmare to say the least.

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