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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Default Trouble shooting new faucet

    I have a leaky tub. And the temp of the water is hot so I replace the valve. I've replace a number of faucet stems, and yet once I got through it leaks as before . Everything is new,seat valve cartiledg
    How should one procede to trouble shoot this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    1,168

    Default Re: Trouble shooting new faucet

    What is the make of the faucet? Is it single lever or two handle?

    John

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    SoCal
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    Default Re: Trouble shooting new faucet

    Are other faucets leaking as well?

    Check the water heater T&P valve, see if it's dripping. You may have too much pressure built up in your heater. Do you have a pressure relief valve (usually located where the main water supply enters the house)? If you have a pressure check device, check a few locations (in the washer, garden hose, etc) and report back with your findings.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Default Re: Trouble shooting new faucet

    It's a Gerber replacement made by Danco. No other leaks. two valves, hot and cold with an additional knob (shower diverter)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Default Re: Trouble shooting new faucet

    there was an additional washer not with the original I tried the faucet both ways with and without this washer ,no difference ( it goes between the flang that snugs up to the outside of the pipe and the pipe.) I did my best to insure that the seat wasn't cross threaded but it was not smooth screwing in ( this didnt concern me at the time the old seat was the nasiest seal for corosion I've seen.) I turned the seal counter clock wise as an engineer/mecanic once showed me until I felt the point of the tread click into place then I started screwing it in (clockwise) I didn'thave a normal seal wrench but used an allen wrench.

  6. #6
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    Jul 2010
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    SoCal
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    Default Re: Trouble shooting new faucet

    Anytime you replace the stems, it is advisable to replace the seats as well. Replace the old ones. You will need a special tool to unscrew the old ones out of the faucet body. Hope this will stop the leak.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    5

    Default Re: Trouble shooting new faucet

    sorry, dj1, you missunderstood me, I didn't explain very well. I did replace the seat. I was describing in detail how I replaced the seat. the old one was very rusty. so the tthreads that hold the seat were rough . I worked to clean the threads first and though rough everything seemed appropriate when I screwed inthe new seat.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Trouble shooting new faucet

    At this point it looks like your new stem washers and seats don't give you a perfect seal, plus you have an old unit with rust and whatelse. If this happened to me, I'd replace the body. You will need an access to the body (from behind the wall). If you are unfamiliar, get a plumber to do it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    5

    Unhappy Re: Trouble shooting new faucet

    dj1
    Your a gentleman and a friend to someone you've never meet.
    Thank you for your help. Your answer wasnt the right one(tongue in cheek) or at least the oneI was hoping to get, but the unwelcomed truth is still a good thing.

    I intend to check out the seat one more time.

    If any one else has any ideas, I'm definitely open to them.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    SoCal
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    Default Re: Trouble shooting new faucet

    You're welcome, dwolf.

    My assessment could be wrong, it's just my opinion based on the info you provided, without seeing and inspecting the situation and the problem, hands on.

    Replacing the entire body is not that difficult, but you need experience in plummbing, because the last thing you want is a leak inside your walls. Most DIYs need help with a problem like this.

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