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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: Crown molding coping question

    Quote Originally Posted by A. Spruce View Post
    It is easy to forget an "obvious" step when you know what you're doing, so as a novice DIY'r, you can't take a single how-to process or video as gospel. It will take trial and error on your part to ferret out the process that works for you.

    What I would recommend is that you forget about those videos for a second and just miter cut yourself some template pieces of trim so that you understand how to orient the material in the saw to get the cuts you need.

    Set the saw at 45*. How you place the material into the saw will depend on whether you're cutting an inside or an outside corner. Cut yourself a set of inside corner and outside corner template pieces. Now, you can simply place your template piece into the saw to set it up before you start whacking away at your lengths of molding.

    If memory serves, holding the material upside down at the correct spring angle against the saw fence will produce an inside corner. Holding the material right side up and facing the fence at the correct spring angle will produce an outside corner. Once you have your template pieces you'll never question saw orientation again.
    Practised again last night, following what I learned from you guys, putting upside down and 45* milter cut, it was much better. I did much research about crown molding installation in advance, but didn't decide coping. Two years ago when I prepared to install a hardwood floor, A. Spruce answered my questions and gave good advices. My job was decent for a amateur. Hopefully this time is the same.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,481

    Default Re: Crown molding coping question

    Glad to be of service. Let us know how it goes. Oh yeah, post some pictures of your work too!
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    nova scotia, canada
    Posts
    1,522

    Default Re: Crown molding coping question

    another thing to consider is if the first peice thats already on the wall is laying at the correct angle on the wall.. meaning is it actually sitting at 45 degrees.. having it off by a degree or two can throw off your mitre cuts angle. check the lay of the crown by nesting a piece of it in a framing square.. when its hitting on the same measurement both on the blade and tongue of the square make a gauge block thats the same dimension..now use it to make small ticks on the wall and ceiling every 16"-24" or so. use the marks as a guideline to keep the crown laying correctly.

    another to do is dont nail the last 2' of the first peice of crown.. just let it float.. you can manipulate it and the coped peice until they joint up just perfect.. use thin shims as required to make the joint nice and tight by shimming where the crown hits the wall or ceiling.. dap it to hide any small gaps where it meets the ceiling or wall
    fire up the saw and make some dust

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,481

    Default Re: Crown molding coping question

    Quote Originally Posted by jkirk View Post
    another to do is dont nail the last 2' of the first peice of crown.. just let it float.. you can manipulate it and the coped peice until they joint up just perfect.
    That's the method I use.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    42

    Default Re: Crown molding coping question

    Make sure when you're coping, to back cut it just a bit, and leave the piece long. That way you can sneak up on the flat cut on the other side that meets in the opposite corner, or if you can spring it into position the slight back cut will bite a bit into the opposing piece. It also helps you avoid having to make a perfect cut since the back side will never be seen.

    i think what was confusing may have been having a compound miter saw to use. While they let you make the cut easier, there is a lot more fiddling to get the angle right. Like others said it's easier to just stick to 45 degrees and make sure the molding is on the fence correctly: base of saw is the "ceiling" and the fence is the "wall."

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